Friday, February 3, 2017

O18-a. Defense Attacks on Child Witnesses' Credibility: Suggestibility and Confabulation

Thomas Lyon

Description

How psychological experts hired by the defense seek to undermine children’s credibility and how their criticisms can be rebutted.

O18-b. Toward the Way Forward: Creating a National Mental Health Strategy for Communities

Merritt D. Schreiber

Description

This presentation is on National Children's Disaster Mental Health Concept of Operations is a comprehensive model managing the consequences of disasters-terrorism-active shooter events on children.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe range of impacts on children after disasters.
  2. Describe the key components of the National Children's Disaster Mental Health CONOPS.
  3. Describe elements of the "stepped triage to care" approach for children in disasters.

Abstract

This presentation will present an overview of the National Children's Disaster Mental Health Concept of Operations. This is a compressive, wrap around" model of managing the psychological consequences of disasters, terrorism and active shooter events on children and families. The presentation will present an overview of the model and highlight real world use in planning and response across the United States.
Purpose: Provide an overview of a population model of pediatric disaster and terrorism impact and a community model that addresses pre-event, response and recovery strategies leveraging "pediatric disaster systems of care" and local healthcare coalitions.
Outcomes:
1) Understand the continuum of risk and resilience to children after disasters and terrorism events
2) Understand the National Children's Disaster Mental Health Concept of Operations approach along with its tools and strategies that can be applied locally.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Thienkrua, W., Lopes Cardozo, B., Somchai Chakkraband, M.L., Guadamuz, T., Pengjuntr, W., Tantipiwatanaskul, P., Sakornsatian, S., Ekassawin, S., Panyayong, B., Varangrat, A., Tappero, J., Schreiber, M. & van Griensven, F. (2006). Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Children in Tsunami-Affected Areas in Southern Thailand. Journal of the American Medical Association, 296 (5), 549-559.
  • Schreiber, M., Pfefferbaum, B, Sayegh, L. The Way Forward: the National Children's Disaster Mental Health Concept of Operations. Disaster Medicine and Public Health, 2012;6:174-181.
  • Schreiber MD, Yin R, Omaish M, Broderick JE. Snapshot from Superstorm Sandy: American Red Cross Mental Health Surveillance in Lower New York State. Ann Emerg Med. 2013 Dec 21. pii: S0196-0644(13)01583-7. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2013.11.009. [Epub ahead of print].

O18-c. A Trauma-Informed Approach to Children Exposed to Violence

Linda Chamberlain

Description

Early childhood trauma can impact brain development and lead to predictable and preventable consequences. Trauma-informed strategies and promising practices for children will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe how the brain explains many of the predictable consequences of childhood exposure to domestic violence and other adversities.
  2. List two common effects of domestic violence on children that may not be recognized as being related to trauma.
  3. Describe three trauma-informed strategies for working with children exposed to violence/ACEs.

Abstract

Purpose:
The brain explains many of the predictable physical, mental, behavioral, and cognitive problems that traumatized children experience. The brain's ability to adapt and change in response to environment is also a pathway to resiliency and healing. The connection between exposure to domestic violence and other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the impact on children is examined within a protective factors framework that highlights the latest research and recommendations on best practices.

Desired Outcome:
Participants will become more familiar with core steps for trauma-informed programming that are applicable to a wide range of settings and identify effective strategies for working with children and families exposed to violence and other adversities that can be integrated into daily practices

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Graham-Bermann, Gruber S, Howell K, Girz H. Factors discriminating profiles of resilience of psychopathology in children exposed to intimate partner violence. Child Abuse and Neglect. 2009; 33(9):648-660.
  • Burke NJ, Hellman J, Scott B, Weems CF, Carrion VG. Impact of adverse childhood experiences on an urban pediatric population. Child Abuse and Neglect. 2011;35(6):408-413.
  • Suglia S, Enlow B, Kullowatz A, Wright R. Maternal intimate partner violence predicts increased asthma in children: buffering effects of supportive caregiving. Archives Pediatric Medicine. 2009;163:244-250.

 

 

Friday Plenary Session with Nadine Burke Harris

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

P15-a. Cancelled

P15-b. Project on the Use of Investigative Interviews in Cases of Child Sexual Abuse

María Paz Rutte, Maurizio Sovino

Description

Given the lack of regulations in Chile and the need for the use of investigative interviews, Fundación Amparo y Justicia, in collaboration with the Prosecutor's Office, has designed a pilot project in cases of child sexual abuse.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about the design of public policies in this field.
  2. Provide a model that can be replicated not only domestically, but internationally (essentially in other Latin American countries given our shared legal traditions).

P15-c. "Let Me Help You Help Me" Dealing With People With a Learning Disability ina Sexual Assault

Catherine White

Description

Improving the screening and identification of people with a learning disability and subsequent communication and management of this vulnerable group by staff dealing with victims of sexual violence.

Learning Objectives

  1. Improve the screening and identification of people with learning disability including assessment of capacity.
  2. Discuss how to improve communication, both face to face and other media e.g. leaflets and website.
  3. Explore how to tailor services to maximise accessibility and acceptability for those with learning disabilities.

Abstract

A routine case review at St Mary's Sexual Assault Referral Centre, Manchester, UK, indicated that there was room for improvement in services provided for sexual violence victims with a learning disability (LD).  A subsequent audit and staff survey revealed that the identification of people with LD was not consistent and staff often lacked confidence in communicating with this group. Moreover the take up of follow on services for those with LD was much lower than for patients without LD. The presentation will explore how the St Mary's team, working in collaboration with people with LD, sought to address these issues including how to improve the screening and identification, communication and management of those with LD.

To download workshop Handout: click here

To download workshop PDF: click here

P15-d. An Oral Health Perspective on Child Maltreatment

Therese Kvist

Description

To prevent poor oral health, early detection of dental disease and adequate support are essential. Also, early detection of child maltreatment is essential to protect children from harm.

Learning Objectives

  1. Dental neglect is a form of child maltreatment that is important to consider in child protection and child welfare.
  2. Collaboration and educational approaches between dental health services and child welfare is essential.
  3. Dental professionals must assess social factors when dental disease and/or attendance behaviors are not explained by other reasonable causes.

Abstract

Children who are exposed to child maltreatment are at risk of developing physical and mental ill-health and of expressing risk-taking behaviors. In addition these children are likely to have neglected dentitions, dental health service avoidance as well as head and neck injuries and intra- oral injuries. To prevent poor oral health, early detection of dental disease and adequate support are essential. Also, early detection of child maltreatment is essential to protect children from harm.

Purpose: To present how oral health and use of dental health service can indicate broader family dysfunction or child maltreatment and to provide clinical recommendations for how to manage a suspicion.

Desired outcomes: To understand how social factors affect children's oral health and why dental professionals are important to incorporate in child welfare and child protection.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Kvist T, Annerbäck EM, Sahlqvist L, Flodmark O, Dahllöf G. Association between adolescents' self-perceived oral health and self-reported experiences of abuse. Eur J Oral Sci 2013; 121: 594–599.
  • Kvist T, Wickström A, Miglis I, Dahllöf G. The dilemma of reporting child maltreatment in pediatric dentistry. Eur J Oral Sci 2014; 122: 332–338.
  • Kvist T, Cocozza M, Annerbäck EM, Dahllöf G. Child maltreatment- prevalence and characteristics of mandatory reports from dental professionals to the Social Services. Int J Paediatr Dent 2016; DOI: 10.1111/ipd.12230.

P15-e. Child and Murder, Part 2: Treatment

Alfons Crijnen

Description

Witnessing the murder of your parent – unthinkable, but it overcomes some children. Which response is to be expected? How will the child respond on treatment?

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the emotional response with anxiety, anger and grief of children after intense trauma.
  2. To understand the medical interviewing techniques facilitating disclosure and emotional recognition and the therapeutic procedures and their impact on the child.
  3. To understand the key importance of mourning and how this is disturbed by the traumatic response.

Abstract

What if a child witnessed the murder of his parents? Is a child able to speak about it? What if the child doesn't tell you anything—did it really see nothing? What if the child shares his experience with you—is this really helpful or will this be counterproductive? What if the child dares to confront itself with the recollection in therapy?

At the moment itself or in the months following the murder, therapists are confronted with these and other questions. Feelings of intense anxiety and anger are in the way of sorrow and grief; recollections are so overwhelming that they can't be shared; the life of the child is disorganised and there is often disturbed mourning.

In the professional treatment of children who witnessed the murder of their parent the following issues are recognized: disclosure and recognition, the management of stress and intense emotions, the development of psychopathology, the impact on the family, therapeutic interventions and treatment, and finally mourning.

In the workshop video clips of interviews of two 4- and 10-year-old children by a police officer directly after the murder and by a child and adolescent psychiatrist seeing the children for diagnosis and treatment at three months and three years after the murder will be shown. Theory and practice will be brought together and guidelines for treatment provided.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Crijnen AAM & Kraan HF: The medical interview in mental health care: effects on the patient and the physician (1987).
  • Spuij, M., Deković, M., & Boelen, P. A. (2015). An open trial of "Grief-Help": A cognitive behavioural treatment for prolonged grief in children and adolescents. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 22, 185-192. doi: 10.1002/cpp.1877.
  • Van Denderen M, de Keijser M, Gerlsma J, Huisman M & Boelen PA.: Revenge and psychological adjustment after homicidal loss. Aggressive Behavior; 40: 504-511 (2014).

 

 

Q18-a. Child Protection of the Future

David Finkelhor

Description

This talk will speculate about how social, political and technological trends might possibly affect the nature of child protection over the next 50 years.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will consider how the availability of enormous quantities of data will affect child protection.
  2. Participants will consider how communications technology will affect child protection.
  3. Participants will consider how behavior altering medications will affect child protection.

Abstract

This talk will speculate about how social, political and technological trends might possibly affect the nature of child protection over the next 50 years. It will discuss the impact of big data, communications technology, behavioral medication, the growth of health care bureaucracies, and demographic trends. This speculation suggests the kinds of preparation and anticipatory discussions that the field might want to have about its future.

To download workshop PDF: click here

Q18-b. Child Abuse Investigative Teams: Where Did We Come From and Where Are We Going?

Donna Pence, Charles Wilson

Description

At the heart of a community response to child abuse is a multidisciplinary team. While building on what has been learned in the last forty years, the session will look into the future of where teams may be going as new technologies and strategies emerge that can facilitate the investigation process, decision making, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the teamwork.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to identify four common barriers to multidisciplinary/multiagency child abuse investigative teams.
  2. Participants will be able to name four key elements of effective teamwork.
  3. Participants will be able to identify three ways they can make their investigative team stronger and investigation more trauma informed.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Wilson, C, Conradi, L, Pence, D (2013) —Trauma Informed Care, Chapter, Encyclopedia of Social Work, Oxford Press, NY, NY.
  • Wilson, C, & McGrath, P (2004) In Search of a New Model for Coordinated Urban Child Abuse Investigations, The Advisor, American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.
  • Pence, D. & Wilson, C, (1994). The Team Investigation of Child Sexual Abuse: The Uneasy Alliance. Sage Publications.

Q18-c. Counterintuitive Victim Behaviors

Anna Salter

Description

Victims of sexual assault often engage in counter-therapeutic behaviors that sabotage their sense of self-worth as well as their legal case. Such behaviors may include not escaping when they had the opportunity, not yelling when others are in the vicinity, continuing on with the evening, (e.g., going to the movies with a date rapist after the rape), texting and having further contact with the offender, and sex with someone else after the assault. This workshop will examine such victim behaviors and the reasons behind them. It will examine the myth that there is one type of victim response to rape and argue that the type of victim response is largely dictated by external factors such as perpetrator counterintuitive behaviors.

Learning Objectives

  1. At conclusion of the workshop, the participants will recognize those behaviors which, in general, are not expected of rape survivors, but which in fact occur in a significant percentage of cases.
  2. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will identify the relationship between counterintuitive victim behaviors and counterintuitive perpetrator behaviors.

Abstract

Victims of sexual assault often engage in counter-therapeutic behaviors that sabotage their sense of self-worth as well as their legal case. Such behaviors may include not escaping when they had the opportunity, not yelling when others are in the vicinity, continuing with the evening, (e.g., going to the movies with a date rapist after the rape), texting and having further contact with the offender, and sex with someone else after the assault. This workshop will examine such victim behavior and the reasons behind those behaviors. The workshop will examine the myth that there is one type of victim response to rape and argue that the type of victim response is largely dictated by external factors, including the presence or absence of counterintuitive perpetrator behaviors.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

R18-a. Prevent, Screen, and Heal: Interrupting the Intergenerational Cycle of Adversity

Nadine Burke Harris

Description

How early adversity can harm the developing brains and bodies of children and impact their long-term health and how we should respond to this urgent public health crisis.

R18-b. Using Big Data to Improve the Child Welfare System

Philip L. Browning

Description

From Amazon's book suggestions to Netflix' movie recommendations--now even clothing companies want to send you boxes of clothes every month they think you'll love, all predictive on  your technological activity. What is predictive analytics technology and how can we harness these technological advancements in child welfare? This workshop will tackle this question and highlight some efforts to explore the use of predictive analytics in California, as well as the challenges we face.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understanding what predictive analytics is. 
  2. Gain a sense of how predictive analytics is being applied in child welfare.
  3. Weigh the advantages and challenges to using big data.

R18-c. Detection of Deception

Anna Salter

Description

This workshop will focus on methods of detecting deception that actually work as opposed to conventional methods such as gaze aversion which research has found repeatedly not to be effective in detecting deception, except in nervous “newbie” offenders.

Learning Objectives

  1. At conclusion of the workshop, the participants will be able to determine which methods of detecting deception are researched-based.
  2. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will understand the role of micro-expressions in expressing affect that the individual would like to mask.

Abstract

This workshop will discuss methods of the detection of deception which are based on conventional wisdom but which research has not found to be valid and reliable, e.g., gaze aversion and fidgeting. The workshop will also address more technical methods of detecting deception, such a micro-expressions, squelched emotion, asymmetrical expression of emotion, and timing of emotion, which research suggests can be reliably used to detect deception, although the logic behind the association is less clear. In addition, the research will address the relationship between power and the ability to fool others.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

Closing Session