Thursday, February 2, 2017

J1. Abusive Head Trauma

Christopher Greeley

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of Abusive Head Trauma. It will outline the common findings associated as well as common mimics.

Learning Objectives

  1. The participant will understand the basic findings seen in children who are victims of AHT.
  2. The participant will understand the basic evaluation of children who are suspected victims of AHT.
  3. The participant will understand some of the alternative explanations for findings which could be confused with AHT.

Abstract

This presentation will cover the basics of Abusive Head Trauma (AHT) in infants and children. The

presentation will cover some of the common findings associated with AHT. The proper evaluation of infants and children with suspected AHT will be covered. Additionally, commonly reported mimics of AHT will be highlighted and discussed. General rules to help the clinician discern abuse from imposters will be discussed.

To download workshop PDF: click here

J2. Epigenetics and Child Abuse: Modern-Day Darwinism—The Miraculous Ability of the Human Genome to Adapt, and Then Adapt Again

Naomi B. Gershon

Description

This session will review studies which have helped us to better understand the critical role of epigenetic programming when individuals are subjected to Adverse Childhood Experiences. It includes information from studies which highlight the growing evidence base for how interventions may prevent and help individuals inflicted by early life toxic stress.

Learning Objectives

  1. Consider early childhood as a “sensitive” rather than a “critical” period in child development.
  2. Understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in toxic stress, both in short-term survival and in negatively impacting future well-being.
  3. Learn about new research suggesting that epigenetic changes are potentially reversible.
  4. Identify evidence-based interventions which can prevent or ameliorate ear toxic stress.
To download workshop PDF: click here

J3. Bridge Over Troubled Waters: Defining Supervisory Competencies for Secondary Traumatic Stress

Brian C. Miller

Description

It is beyond argument that supervision one of the most fundamental supports we can provide for our trauma-exposed team members. This workshop describes what, exactly, that supervision should include.

Learning Objectives

  1. List five competencies that supervisors should possess in order to be "secondary trauma informed".
  2. Describe what supervisors should observe in their team members that may indicate secondary trauma.
  3. Identify specific resources for supporting supervisors in developing secondary trauma competency.

Abstract

Purpose: It is beyond argument that supervision one of the most fundamental supports we can provide for our trauma-exposed team members. The importance of supportive supervision has been emphasized by virtually all writers and researchers in the field of secondary trauma. But there is a secret in our field that we have rarely acknowledged: Many of our supervisors don't know how to best provide support to staff who have been exposed to secondary trauma.

Supervisors working in child welfare may have not been formally trained to the supervisory role, and are even less likely to be trained specifically in how to support their staff in mitigating the effects of secondary trauma. Most of us have not systematically received information on identifying the signs of secondary trauma, or what to do to support our team members who are evidencing strain. Adding to this problem is the fact that the field has lacked definitions of what supervisors should do to help mitigate the effects of trauma exposure.

Desired Outcome: This training will present the core competencies that supervisors in child welfare field should possess in order to provide supportive supervision to their team. What knowledge shouldbsupervisors possess about secondary trauma, and what skills are prerequisite to this role? These questions will be answered, as well as discussion about strategies for how to make this—yet another supervisory demand—feasible in the real world.

To download workshop PDF: click here

J4. Interviewing the Sextortion Victim

Catherine Connell

Description

This session will focus on the dynamics of sextortion, the victims, the forensic interview and special case considerations when a large number of victims are involved.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants understand what sextortion is.
  2. Participants understand the egregious nature of this violation and the victim dynamics.
  3. Participants can incorporate this information in their forensic interviews.

To download workshop PDF: click here

J5. Child Pornography and the Nexus to Child Molestation

Joe Laramie

Description

This workshop will dispel "it's just pictures" myth of child pornography, the impact on victims and possible correlation between those who collect child pornography and those who molest children.

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the process that leads from fantasy to the act of child sexual abuse.
  2. Describe the impact of child pornography on victims.
  3. Identify benefits of aggressive law enforcement action toward collectors of child pornography as prevention to child sexual abuse.

Abstract

Participants will gain a better understanding of child pornography and dispel the "it's just pictures" myth. Attendees will hear of the devastating and long-term impact on victims. Discussion will include an overview of studies highlighting the possible correlation between those who collect child pornography and those who molest children and the benefits of aggressive investigations as a prevention tool.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Courts Caught in the Web: Fixing a Failed System with Factors Designed for Sentencing Child Pornography Offenders; Brendan J. Sheehan, 2015.
  • A Review of Online Grooming; Whittle, Hamilton-Giachritsis, Been, Collings, 2013 .
  • The 'Butner Study' Redux: A Report of the Incidence of Hands-on Child Victimization by Child Pornography Offenders; Bourke, Hernandez, 2008.
To download a zipped folder of workshop PDFs: click here

J6. Proving Child Abuse in Court: Investigation to Verdict, Part 1

Thomas J. Fallon, Amy Meyers, Paul Stern

Description

Through Case studies, this three-part workshop provides practical guidance on successful investigation and prosecution of physical and sexual abuse and domestic violence. This section covers investigation, including forensic interviewing of victims, witnesses, and suspects.

Learning Objectives

  1. Increase knowledge and skill in investigation of child abuse.
  2. Increase knowledge and skill in prosecution of child abuse.
  3. Increase knowledge and skill regarding expert testimony in child abuse cases.

Abstract

This three-part workshop provides practical guidance on successful investigation and prosecution of physical and sexual abuse.

Part 1: covers investigation, including forensic interviewing of victims, witnesses, and suspects.

Part 2: addresses evidence issues at trial, including hearsay and Crawford, forfeiture by wrongdoing, character evidence, uncharged misconduct evidence, impeachment, and child witnesses.

Part 3: discusses effective use of expert testimony, including direct and cross-examination. The workshops build on each other, but each stands on its own, so one could attend all three, or pick and choose. This workshop will be valuable for the novice or expert investigator or litigator. The goal is to equip attendees with the latest developments in case law, research, and trial technique..

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Paul Stern, Preparing and Presenting Expert Testimony in Child Abuse Litigation (1997).

J7. Further Lessons from the Evaluation of Major Reforms of a State Child Protection System in Australia

Ilan Katz, Jenny Marshall, Graham Vimpani

Description

Keep Them Safe was a $750 M (AU) whole of government reform of the child protection system in NSW Australia from 2009-2014 that was carefully evaluated. What challenges have been encountered since?

Learning Objectives

  1. Reflect on lessons learned from a whole of government reform of the child protection system in New South Wales, Australia and its evaluation.
  2. Reflect on the role of evaluation in policy reform in child protection.
  3. Find out about policy developments concerning the child protection system in NSW since the evaluation.

Abstract

Keep Them Safe (KTS) was a whole of government reform of the child protection system in New South Wales, Australia involving an investment of $750 million (AUD) from 2009 to 2014. Although the reform was similar in some ways to many Differential Response reforms in the USA, it was more wide ranging and involved many government agencies as well as the NGO sector. The reform included changes to legislation, multiple new programs and services, and significant structural and cultural changes.

The evaluation of KTS reported in 2014, found that the reform was successful in changing the way services were provided to vulnerable children in NSW, but there was still a long way to go to achieve a world class child protection system. This presentation will cover policy developments since the evaluation was completed, focusing on lessons learned and the role of evaluation in policy reform in child protection. An immediate consequence of the evaluation was that KTS funding has been continued for another three years. Several other initiatives have been put in place to improve child protection practice and early intervention including major reforms to the out-of-home care system. It has however been difficult to sustain a whole of government approach to child protection in NSW, and collaboration across sectors has become more piecemeal and fragmented.

There are a number of lessons from KTS and its evaluation, including that system reform is slow and difficult. It requires strong ongoing leadership. Forward planning is essential from the outset, and evaluations should be closely aligned with the policy process. Policy makers need to be more realistic about what can be achieved by short term programs, no matter how well funded and ambitious. However despite these challenges the overall state of child protection in NSW has considerably improved over the past eight years.

J8. Domestically Violent Homes: The Threat of Harm for Infant and Young Children

Andrew Campbell

Description

This presentation will discuss the specific threats of physical, psychological, and emotional harm for infants and young children living in a home where domestic violence occurs.

Learning Objectives

  1. To be able to identify and dispel common misconceptions regarding young child and infant exposure to domestic violence.
  2. To be able to describe the specific risks of harm for young children and infants associated with violent-offending caregivers and caregivers victimized by violence.
  3. To be able to discuss the emotional and psychological effects often associated with living in these "environment of violence".

Abstract

This presentation will discuss the specific threats of harm for infants and young children living in a home where domestic violence occurs. Common misconceptions will be addressed, including the idea that a child can be too young to be affected by domestic violence, physically observable signs of injury are an appropriate estimator of victimization, and the idea that children who do not actually see a violent act occur are not significantly harmed by it. Other topics to be discussed include: the various forms of child emotional maltreatment, toxic stress, child-caregiver attachment, "unavailable parenting", the effects of witnessing threats or violence against animals living within the home, caregiver risk factors for domestic violence and emotional maltreatment, how to identify victims, and what to do once victims have been identified.

At the conclusion of this presentation attendees will be able to identify and dispel common misconceptions related to young child and infant exposure to domestic violence, be able to describe the specific risks of harm for young children and infants associated with violent-offending caregivers and caregivers victimized by violence, and be able to discuss the emotional and psychological effects often associated with living in these "environment of violence".

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Campbell, A.M., & Thompson, S.L. (2015). The emotional maltreatment of children in domestically violent homes: Identifying gaps in education and addressing common misconceptions. Child Abuse & Neglect, 48, 39-49.
  • De Bellis, M.D. (2005). The psychobiology of neglect. Child Maltreatment, 10, 150-172.
  • Erickson, M. F., & Egeland, B. (2002). Child neglect. In J. E. Myers, L. Berliner, J. Briere, C. T. Hendrix, C.Jenny, & T. A. Reid (Eds.), The APSAC handbook on child maltreatment (2nd ed., pp. 3–20). Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage.
  • Campbell, A.M., & Hibbard, R. (2014). More than words: The emotional maltreatment of children. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 61, 959-970.

To download workshop PDF: click here

J10. What Does Quality Treatment Look Like? Identifying Effective Substance Use Treatment for Families in the Child Welfare System

Jill Gresham

Description

This session will provide child welfare workers with an understanding of the elements of quality substance use disorder treatment for families in the child welfare system so they can refer parents to more effective treatment providers in their community. The presenter will utilize a tool developed by the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW) to facilitate discussion on substance use disorders, the treatment and recovery process, and how to determine if a treatment program is appropriate for families involved with child welfare.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify key elements of effective substance use treatment for families in child welfare.
  2. Learn about the treatment and recovery process and how it impacts the child welfare case.
  3. Identify strategies to partner with substance use treatment providers to better serve families affected by substance use disorders.

Abstract

Particularly in the wave of the current opioid epidemic, child welfare professionals are increasingly challenged by serving families affected by substance use disorders. To engage families in services, child welfare professionals must partner with substance use disorder treatment providers in their community and have an understanding of what effective treatment programs look like to provide an optimal level of support for the parent’s treatment and recovery. The National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW) developed a set of guiding questions aimed to provide child welfare workers with a set of considerations and information to gather from their treatment partners about the treatment in their community. These guiding questions may be used to direct a discussion with treatment partners and help child welfare workers gather information on the types and quality of services provided for families who are involved with child welfare. This tool will help child welfare agencies become better consumers of substance abuse treatment.

This workshop will consist of a facilitated discussion on what quality substance use treatment looks like for families in child welfare. The presenter will utilize the tool developed by the NCSACW to highlight elements of effective treatment and demonstrate how it could be used to spur discussions with treatment providers. The presenter will also highlight the treatment process and how to effectively partner with substance use treatment providers to develop warm handoffs and effectively refer parents to treatment.

Participants will leave this session with a knowledge of how to utilize this tool it in their own community. The presenter will also spotlight and encourage attendees take the NCSACW’s free online training; Understanding Substance Use Disorders, Treatment, and Family Recovery: A Guide for Child Welfare Professionals; to better understand the treatment and recovery process for families involved with the child welfare system.

To download workshop PDF: click here

J11. My Body and Me

Hilde Johansen, Sissel Ulstein

Description

Violence and sexual abuse Teaching in primary and secondary school; abuse. Today, the Norwegian school teaches children very little about sexuality, and even less about violence and sexual abuse. SMISO (Centre Against Incest and sexual abuse), in collaboration with the foundation "my choice" created a teaching plan that addresses these topics.

Learning Objectives

    1. Preventing sexual abuse of children by teaching about normal sexuality and when to worry.
    2. Teach adults how to better protect children against sexual abuse.
    3. Teaching how to speak to children about what is legal, normal or not, and how to protect themselves.

Abstract

We know today that many children are exposed to violence and sexual abuse. Children who experience this often feel shame and guilt, and many believe they are alone with this experience. These children are entitled to know that abuse should never happen, and that it's not their fault! The child is NEVER to blame for abuse!

Today, the Norwegian school teaches children very little about sexuality, and even less about violence and sexual abuse. SMISO (Centre Against Incest and sexual abuse), in collaboration with the foundation "my choice" created a teaching plan that addresses these topics. The teaching consists of 4 lessons of 45 minutes each, where we talk, draw, watch movies and listen to a song about children's rights.

We have now taught in over 40 classes, with children aged 7-12 years. At every schools we have been to, pupils have approached us, talking to us about what they experience at home; violence, abuse, quarrels between parents and offensive behavior from peers. We have sent several reports of concern to child welfare authorities so that those children will get help.

We see quite clearly that this teaching is needed; we reach many children, school staff and parents. In addition, the teaching has a clear preventive effect. It is preventive by giving employees better skills for teaching children and young people about their bodies, feelings and boundaries. It gives parents information about sexual abuse, and what signs and signals they may look for.

But most importantly, we are able to communicate to your children that it is never their fault that violence and abuse happens!

J14. Technologies and Law Enforcement Projects Focused on Detecting Real-Time Sexual Abuse of Children

Moderator: Richard Brown, Ronald Laney

Description

How new technologies and law enforcement projects are transforming how law enforcement investigates child sexual abuse and enables them to rescue more children from real time abuse by creating a "Victim Centric Policing" environment.

Learning Objectives

  1. Technology used to detect images of child exploitation.
  2. Technology used to identify the newest victims of abuse.
  3. Awareness of current law enforcement practices.

Abstract

Child Sexual Exploitation materials are being produced and traded all over the world today. Law Announcement is overwhelmed trying to identify and rescue the most recent victims being assaulted real time through streaming video on demand and images coming from every type of electronic hosting service.  This block will give an overview of some major cutting edge technologies and projects being used and developed to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to sifting through millions of images, videos and the portals used for this illicit distribution. The technologies and projects discussed are used to develop a paradigm shift into this type of victim focused policing and demonstrate how victim identification efforts have matured and become the highest priority for international law enforcement. Projects discussed will include, Project PhotoDNA, Project VIC, The Global Alert Network and Project Arachnid.

 

 

Thursday Plenary Session with Vamık Djemal Volkan

Vamik Djemal Volkan

Learning Objectives

  1. To illustrate why the age of a child is important in our evaluation of his or her response to losses during wars, war-like situations and/or dislocations.
  2. To examine the concept of "depositing" in understanding how a war trauma can turn a child into a "living statue."
  3. To investigate the role of "linking objects" in refugees' mourning processes.

Abstract

During wars, war-like situations and escapes from dangerous locations, the physical health and security concerns of children (and their families) are our first priority. Children, like adults, also become exposed to psychological trauma primarily connected with various types of physical and psychological losses, helplessness and humiliation. Children's perceptions of what is lost, their response to it, conscious and unconscious fantasies such events induce in them, ability to mourn, and their understanding of the concept of "enemy" vary according to their age at the time of exposure to the war trauma or when they became refugees.  During these traumatic events, the availability of protective adults also varies. Meanwhile, the children's internal worlds may become "reservoirs" of unwanted images held by the traumatized adults around them (trangenerational transmissions).

The presenter will tell stories of children of war and refugee children from different parts of the world with whom he worked during recent decades. By doing so, he aims to illustrate and bring attention to psychological areas which need to be understood and responded to by the professional caretakers, especially mental health workers and teachers. The presenter also will give examples of adults who went through war trauma and/or who were forced to relocate during their childhood to show that, in the long run, some individuals can give creative responses to what happened to them when they were very young while others are not so lucky.

To download workshop Handout: click here

 

William Friedrich Memorial Luncheon and Lecture featuring Francien Lamers-Winkelman

 

Ellen Case, Francien Lamers-Winkelman

Description

The similarities and differences in sexual behavior of children, as observed by parents in the USA using the original Child Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI) and Dutch parents, using the Dutch CSBI  will be presented and discussed.

Learning Objectives

  1. To learn to be aware of cultural differences in sexual behaviors in children.
  2. To understand that "sexuality"depends on how people are familiar with their own body and non sexual body contact.
  3. To understand that it is possible that attitudes with regard to child sexual behaviors could have changed since 1997.

Abstract

The Child Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI; Friedrich, 1997) is a 38-item checklist designed to detect abnormal sexual behavior that can be an expression of sexual abuse in children aged 2 to 12. The Dutch translation of the CSBI was made available for professionals in 1998, with the permission of Bill Friedrich.

However, up till now, Dutch professionals were using the norms for American children. Nearly 20 years after the publication of the American Professional Manual of the CSBI (Friedrich, 1997), the Dutch Professional Manual has been published (Verlinden & Lamers-Winkelman, 2016).

Using data of 2853 Dutch children (the normative group), data of 491 sexually abused children, 177 children with functional abdominal pain, constipation or fecal incontinence (not sexually abused), and 224 children who were victims/witnesses of interparental violence (not sexually abused), we composed Dutch norms for the developmental Related Sexual Behavior Scale (DRSB) and the Sexual Abuse Specific Items Scale (SASI).

In this presentation we will present the Dutch CSBI, and especially discuss the (huge) differences and similarities between the sexual behavior as observed by the parents in the USA and the Netherlands.

Moreover, we will compare the Dutch and USA data with those collected in other European countries, and discuss whether the differences are due to a change in how people think about sexuality and especially sexuality in (young) children since 1997.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Visser, M., & Kim Schoemaker, K., de Schipper, K., Lamers-Winkelman, F., & Finkenauer, C. (2015; published online). Interparental Violence and the Mediating Role of Parental Availability in Children's Trauma Related Symptoms. Journ. Child. Adol. Trauma DOI 10.1007/s40653-015-0071-y
  • Snoeren, F., Hoefnagels, C., Evers, S.M.A.A., & Lamers-Winkelman, F. (2013). Design of a prospective study on mental health and quality of life of maltreated children (aged 5–16 years) after a report to an advice and reporting center on child abuse and neglect. BMC Public Health, 13, 942, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/942
  • Rinne-Albers, M.A.W., Van der Wee, N.J.A., Lamers-Winkelman, F., & Vermeiren, R.J.M. (2013). Neuroimaging in children, adolescents and young adults with psychological trauma. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 22(12), 745-755. DOI 10.1007/s00787-013-0410-1.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

K15-a. Establishing Services for Complainants of Sexual Assault in the West Bank, State of Palestine: A United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Project

Catherine White, David Wells

Description

A needs assessment and development of a service infrastructure to improve the medical and social interventions for complainants of sexual violence in the West Bank, State of Palestine.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss the current picture of sexual violence in the West Bank.
  2. Explore the process of building capacity of sexual violence services within the West Bank
  3. Explore the lessons learned in delivering training when trainees and trainers are from differen cultures.

Abstract

Responses to victims of sexual violence in the West Bank, State of Palestine have been under developed.  The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), with financial support of Global Affairs Canada, is implementing the project entitled "Forensic Human Resource and Governance Development Assistance for the Palestinian Authority".

One aspect of this was to build the capacity of the forensic medical response available to victims of sexual violence in the West Bank. Working with local professionals, the UNODC team conducted a needs assessment, drew up an action plan, and commenced implementation.

This presentation will describe the journey so far including the production of a monograph for the forensic clinicians and the establishment of sexual assault clinics. Whilst some aspects of the project will be unique to the West Bank setting, many of the opportunities and challenges will be similar to those encountered when advancing medico-legal services in other settings including nations where violence may be endemic, there are economic barriers, religious and cultural divides and limited access or capacity of medical, policing and legal services. Forensic medicine and its practitioners have the potential to make significant contributions in this field.

K15-b. Preventative Work in the Area of Incest and Sexual Abuse

Silje Braastad, Trine​ Norevik

Description

Let's Talk About It": An educational program for elementary school aged children.

Learning Objectives

  1. The preventative benefits of early intervention.
  2. How to implement the educational program in practice.
  3. The pitfalls, challenges, and program evaluation.

Abstract

Abstract:
The Centre for Survivors of Incest and Sexual Abuse (SMISO Hordaland) is an organization that provides supportive counseling to survivors of incest and sexual abuse. Within its field, SMISO is also one of the leading agencies in Norway in conducting preventative work amongst school aged children.

Incest and sexual abuse are often rarely discussed issues, which in itself perpetuates the problem. Particularly in cases of incest, the perpetrator often relies on the secretive nature of the topic to facilitate the abuse. SMISO's intensions, therefore, are to empower children by providing a safe, professional and supportive forum where they are able to talk about topics that might otherwise be subjected to secrecy.

Since 2010 SMISO has successfully presented an educational program called, "Let's Talk About It" to Norwegian children between the ages of eleven and twelve (in the 6th grade).

Within a safe environment the educational program aims to:

  • Enhance children's knowledge about incest and sexual abuse.
  • Enhance their ability to recognize early signs of grooming and transboundary behavior,
  • Provide young children with the adequate skills to seek help if necessary.
  • Prevent transboundary behavior in adolescence

Description:

  • Based on an open-ended dialog between children and professionals.
  • Session duration: two hours.
  • Topics covered: positive/negative touch and emotions, good/bad secrets, the body, private parts and sexuality, incest and sexual abuse,,substance abuse, domestic violence, physical and mental illness, children's rights, criminal offences and safe caregivers.

K15-c. Detection of Child Abuse in Out-of-Hours Primary Care: To Screen or Not to Screen?

Maartje Schouten

Description

Child abuse is often unrecognized at Out-of-hours Primary Care locations (OPC). Screening instruments can assist physicians in recognizing child abuse at an early stage. The most efficient screening instrument for child abuse consists of two questions, with a high clinical applicability for physicians.

Learning Objectives

  1. The screening instrument SPUTOVAMO-R2 has a low detection rate of child abuse at the OPC, with a high false positive rate.
  2. The most efficient screening instrument for child abuse consists of two questions, with a high clinical applicability for physicians.

Abstract

Background: The primary aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of the screening instrument SPUTOVAMO-R2 (checklist) for child abuse for Out-of-hours Primary Care locations (OPC), by comparing the test outcome with information from Child Protection Services (CPS). The secondary aim was to determine if reducing the length of the checklist is possible without compromising the diagnostic value.

Methods: All children attending one of the five participating OPC's in the region of Utrecht, the Netherlands, in a year time, were included. The checklist is an obligatory field in the electronic patient file and was filled in for all children. CPS provided data on all checklist positives and a sample of 5500 checklist negatives (dataset). The test outcome was compared with a report to CPS in 10 months follow up after the OPC visit.

Results: The checklist was filled in for 50671 children; 108 (0.2%) were positive. Within the dataset,
emotional neglect was the most frequent type of abuse reported to CPS (32.8%). The Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of the checklist for child abuse was 8.3 (95% CI 3.9 to 15.2), with 9 correct positives. The Negative Predictive Value (NPV) was 99.1 (98.8 to 99.3), with 52 false negatives. When the length of the checklist was reduced to two questions of the original five questions (SPUTOVAMO-R3), the PPV increased to 9.1 (3.7 to 17.8) and the NPV remained 99.1 (98.7 to 99.3). These two questions are on the injury in relation to the history, and the interaction between and with parents/child.

Conclusions: The checklist has a low detection rate of child abuse, with a high false positive rate. The
checklist can be reduced to two questions with a high clinical applicability and comparable diagnostic
value (SPUTOVAMO-R3). When the checklist classifies positive, thorough diagnostic evaluation is

necessary to reduce the high number of false positive screens.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Louwers EC, Affourtit MJ, Moll HA, De Koning HJ, Korfage IJ. Screening for child abuse at emergency departments: a systematic review. Arch Dis Child 2010 Mar;95(3):214-8.
  • Louwers EC, Korfage IJ, Affourtit MJ, Ruige M, van den Elzen AP, De Koning HJ, et al. Accuracy of a screening instrument to identify potential child abuse in emergency departments. Child Abuse Negl 2014 Jul;38(7):1275-81.
  • Sittig JS. Child abuse: the value of systematic screening at Emergency Rooms. Ridderkerk: Ridderprint BV. 2015.
To download workshop PDF: click here

K15-d. Child and Murder, Part 1: Disclosure and Diagnosis

Alfons Crijnen

Description

Witnessing the murder of your parent—unthinkable, but it overcomes some children. Which response is to be expected? How will the child respond on treatment?

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the emotional response with anxiety, anger and grief of children after intense trauma.
  2. To understand the medical interviewing techniques facilitating disclosure and emotional recognition and the therapeutic procedures and their impact on the child.
  3. To understand the key importance of mourning and how this is disturbed by the traumatic response.

Abstract

What if a child witnessed the murder of his parents? Is a child able to speak about it? What if the child doesn't tell you anything – did it really see nothing? What if the child shares his experience with you—is this really helpful or will this be counterproductive? What if the child dares to confront itself with the recollection in therapy?

At the moment itself or in the months following the murder, therapists are confronted with these and other questions. Feelings of intense anxiety and anger are in the way of sorrow and grief; recollections are so overwhelming that they can't be shared; the life of the child is disorganised and there is often disturbed mourning.

In the professional treatment of children who witnessed the murder of their parent the following issues are recognized: disclosure and recognition, the management of stress and intense emotions, the development of psychopathology, the impact on the family, therapeutic interventions and treatment, and finally mourning.

In the workshop video clips of interviews of two 4- and 10-year-old children by a police officer directly after the murder and by a child and adolescent psychiatrist seeing the children for diagnosis and treatment at three months and three years after the murder will be shown. Theory and practice will be brought together and guidelines for treatment provided.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Crijnen AAM & Kraan HF: The medical interview in mental health care: effects on the patient and the physician (1987).
  • Spuij, M., Deković, M., & Boelen, P. A. (2015). An open trial of "Grief-Help": A cognitive behavioural treatment for prolonged grief in children and adolescents. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 22, 185-192. doi: 10.1002/cpp.1877.
  • Van Denderen M, de Keijser M, Gerlsma J, Huisman M & Boelen PA.: Revenge and psychological adjustment after homicidal loss. Aggressive Behavior; 40: 504-511 (2014)..

K15-e. The Promise of Europe: Spreading and Promoting European Centers as in Children's Advocacy Centers adn Barnahus Model

Janet van Bavel

Description

An overview of the European project supporting the European Child-Friendly Centers as in the Barnahus Model and Chadwick Center. Involves the cooperation between European countries, inspired by Kempe, USA Child Advocacy Centers and Family Justice Centers. Also highlights of some developments within the Netherlands specifically.

Learning Objectives

  1. Highlights of European project supporting research, advocacy, training and implementing Child Friendly Centers throughout Europe.
  2. Highlights and challenges of Netherlands approaches in within this context.

Abstract

Workshop is about the progress of the in 2015 started European project called PROMISE, supporting Child Friendly Centers throughout Europe based on the BARNAHUS model. Involves cooperation between 24 European countries, inspired by both USA Child Advocacy Centers and Family Justice Centers.

Background: The Secretariat of the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) was awarded an European Union grant to conduct the project: PROMISE Promoting Multidisciplinary Interagency Services for Child Victims of Violence in 2015. The partnering countries of this project include Iceland, Sweden, Netherlands, United Kingdom, and Belgium. 12 Pilot Countries benefit directly within the project and 24 European States are involved and have access to deliverables such as the reports, scorecard, website and webinars. This workshop is to introduce to the audience the objectives, methodologies, and expected outcomes ofPROMISE.

Additionally, an update will be given on progress in the Netherlands National network of One Stop Shop Approaches in tackling Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence, as started by signing the 2014 San Diego Declaration, combining forces and change Netherlands policy and care provisions to achieve a nationwide network.

Speaker is EU project leader at Verwey-Jonker Instituut, Netherlands and Service Exchange Coordinator within PROMISE; Promoting Multidisciplinary Interagency Services for Child Victims of Violence. He is also Chairman of the Board of NeSPCAN and Counsillor at ISPCAN.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

L1. Brains, Teens, Child Abuse, and Self Harm: How are They Connected?

Jay N. Giedd

Description

This workshop will focus on research that has explored the adolescent brain. An important issue for those that work with victimized teens.

L2. O.S.C.A.R.S. (Out-Standing Child Abuse Research Selections)

Christopher Greeley

Description

The top ten articles published in the last year will be reviewed and discussed with participation from the audience.

Learning Objectives

  1. To acquaint the audience with the top ten articles selected by the presenter.
  2. To critique these articles.
  3. To estimate the validity of the articles and the relevance to current practice.

Abstract

This selection of literature published in the last year represents the presenter's opinion of the best papers published in that time frame. The learning objectives are to become acquainted with these articles, to critique them, and to estimate their validity. Audience participation will be encouraged and will add to the discussion.

To download workshop PDF: click here

L3. The Deep Well: The Components for Enhancing Clinician Experience and Reducing Trauma Model for Sustaining a Career in Trauma Work

Brian C. Miller

Description

Mere survival in our jobs is insufficient--sustaining a career in trauma work requires that we have learned how to make this work not only tolerable, but meaningful--and at times, even enjoyable.

Learning Objectives

  1. List five key skills for managing intense affect and reducing post-work agitation.
  2. Describe how intense negative feelings can be "metabolized" so they do not produce negative and long-term effects.
  3. Commit to a strategy to change the participant's way of engaging their work when they return.

Abstract

Purpose: The negative effects of being exposed to the retelling of--and images of-- childhood trauma—are well known in the field of secondary trauma. Most approaches aiming to lessen the effects of secondary trauma employ self-care strategies for "recovering from" the effects of exposure in the off-duty hours.

In contrast to this self-care approach, the CE-CERT model (components for enhancing clinician experience and reducing trauma) synthesizes evidence-informed components from multi-disciplinary sources into a model of sustaining the emotional regulation of the clinician (Miller & Sprang, 2016). The result of implementing these skills is the enhancement the real time experience of the therapist as they provide trauma treatment, and immediate recovery after a difficult experience. The goal is to define specific ways of sustaining trauma workers as they perform this service to their communities.

The CE-CERT model identifies five key clinical practice and supervision skills that will be described in this session. We will also reference the foundational source of the relevant neuropsychological, social cognitive, anxiety and trauma treatment literature from which they are drawn.

These are the skills we need to make ourselves more resilient to the secondary effects of intense therapy experiences:

  1. skills for engaging and "metabolizing" intense affect;
  2. skills for decreasing rumination;
  3. conscious oversight of narrative;
  4. reducing emotional labor, and
  5. parasympathetic recovery.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Miller, B., & Sprang, G. (2016). A Components-Based Practice and Supervision Model for Reducing Compassion Fatigue by Affecting Clinician Experience. Traumatology. Advance online publication. dx.doi.org/10.1037/trm0000058.

L4. Protective Parent Panic

Anna Salter

Description

This workshop will discuss coaching parents and also those parents who are mistaken for coaching parents because they panic and behave irrationally after their child makes an initial disclosure of child sexual abuse.

Learning Objectives

  1. At conclusion of the workshop, the participants will understand the difference in coaching mothers and unstable mothers (whose behavior followed rather than preceded the original disclosure).
  2. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will know methods of determining whether the behavior of the mother is more consistent with coaching reports of child sexual abuse or responding irrationally to reports of child sexual abuse.

Abstract

When children disclose incest by one parent, the revelation is often traumatic for the non-offending spouse as well as the victim. While many spouses react to the disclosure in logical and emotionally stable ways, not all do. Some non-offending spouses have pre-existing personality disorders or fragile mental health conditions that become unstable as a result of the disclosure of sexual abuse. Such parents may react in emotionally labile ways that alienate investigators, police, and judges. Such parents may have grilled their children despite requests not to, may have exaggerated the child’s symptoms or disclosures, and may have even directly lied about specific aspects of the case. Particularly when the couple is in the midst of separation or divorce proceedings, such a non-offending spouse is often suspected OF coaching false allegations.

While false allegations do exist and may be the result of coaching, there are also cases in which the illogical behavior came after the initial disclosure and disclosure did not change after the onset of the illogical behavior, i.e., the child’s initial disclosures never changed despite parental pressure. This workshop will examine the differences in what could be termed “Protective Parent Panic” and “coaching” of the original report.

L5. Child Sexual Abuse Interviews for the Investigator—Why the Color of the Underwear Matters

Craig Smith

Description

Child Abuse victims can often provide investigators with crucial information that can corroborate their initial disclosure. Recognizing and eliciting this material can prove invaluable during a subsequent suspect interview.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will learn how to elicit detailed information from child victims in a nonleading, non-traumatic fashion. These details allow the investigator to not only assess the credibility of the victim, but also provides the basic information necessary to develop an effective plan for the later interview of the suspect.
  2. In intrafamilial cases of Child Sexual Abuse the partner/spouse of the suspect isoften an overlooked, but valuable source of information. We will explore interview techniques that can be useful in obtaining crucial information about the familial relationship as well as the values and sexual habits of the suspect.
  3. Attendees will then learn how to take the detailed information gleaned from the child victim and the non-offending spouse and use it to develop effective strategies for a comprehensive interview of the suspect.

Abstract

There is a harsh truth within law enforcement and child protection circles; few people are anxious to investigate Child Sexual Abuse cases. Most investigators feel ill at ease with discussing sexual details with victims, witnesses or suspects. These uncomfortable details however are often the foundation upon which an officer must build a case.

The objective of this workshop is to provide investigators with interviewing strategies that can be used to elicit detailed information from both the child victim and in intrafamilial cases, from the non-offending parent. Invaluable, corroborative evidence that goes beyond the traditional search for torn clothing and seminal stains, is often present, if the investigator knows what to look for. Gathering precise details about the abuse, along with background information about the abuser, often leads to a successful interrogation of the suspect.

The author is a Certified Forensic Chid Interviewer and this presentation is based upon his successful investigation of hundreds of Child Sexual Abuse files.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Veith, V. (1999) When a Child Stands Alone: The Search for Corroborating Evidence. American Prosecutors Research Institute, 12, 1-4.
  • Lippert, T., Cross, T.P., Jones, L., & Walsh, W. (2010) Suspect Confession of Child Sexual Abuse to Investigators. Child Maltreatment, 15(2) 161-170.
  • Svedin, C., & Back, C. (2011) Why Didn't They Tell Us? On Sexual Abuse in Child Pornography. Save the Children Sweden.

L6. Proving Child Abuse in Court: Investigation to Verdict, Part 2

Thomas J. Fallon, Amy Meyers, Paul Stern

Description

Through Case studies, this three-part workshop provides practical guidance on successful investigation and prosecution of physical and sexual abuse and domestic violence. This section covers investigation, including forensic interviewing of victims, witnesses, and suspects.

Learning Objectives

  1. Increase knowledge and skill in investigation of child abuse.
  2. Increase knowledge and skill in prosecution of child abuse.
  3. Increase knowledge and skill regarding expert testimony in child abuse cases.

Abstract

This three-part workshop provides practical guidance on successful investigation and prosecution of physical and sexual abuse.

Part 1: covers investigation, including forensic interviewing of victims, witnesses, and suspects.

Part 2: addresses evidence issues at trial, including hearsay and Crawford, forfeiture by wrongdoing, character evidence, uncharged misconduct evidence, impeachment, and child witnesses.

Part 3: discusses effective use of expert testimony, including direct and cross-examination. The workshops build on each other, but each stands on its own, so one could attend all three, or pick and choose. This workshop will be valuable for the novice or expert investigator or litigator. The goal is to equip attendees with the latest developments in case law, research, and trial technique.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Paul Stern, Preparing and Presenting Expert Testimony in Child Abuse Litigation (1997).
  • John E.B. Myers, Myers on Evidence of Interpersonal Violence: Child Maltreatment, Intimate Partner Violence, Rape, Stalking, and Elder Abuse (6th ed. 2016).

L7-a. Transporting an Evidence-Based Treatment for Child Physical Abuse from the U.S. Across Sweden: Outcomes, Lessons Learned, and Strategies to Promote Implementation

Melissa Runyon, Cecilia Kjellgren, Doris Nilsson, Melissa Runyon, Johanna Thulin

Description

An overview of Combined Parent Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT), supporting research conducted in the US, and outcomes associated with Sweden's pilot and large-scale dissemination projects. Lessons learned as well as strategies for overcoming therapists' skepticism, and cultural differences to promote successful implementation will be shared.

Learning Objectives

  1. To educate professionals about an EBT for families who have experienced or are at-risk for child physical abuse.
  2. To share process and research outcomes associated with large-scale dissemination of EBT across Sweden.
  3. To educate professionals about strategies to over come barriers and to promote successful dissemination of EBT for child physical abuse.

Abstract

Despite Swedish law legally banning the use of corporal punishment with children nearly 40 years ago, 13% of children report child physical abuse (CPA) by their parents. Limited treatments targeting CPA were available until Combined Parent Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT) was introduced in Sweden ten years ago, to four agencies within child welfare/child adolescent psychiatry. CPC-CBT (Runyon & Deblinger, 2013; Runyon et al., 2009; 2010), an evidence-based therapy including both the traumatized child and parent, was developed in the U.S. to address the needs of families who are at-risk forCPA.

A pilot study (Kjellgren et al., 2013) reported significant positive outcomes for both Swedish children and parents after their participation in treatment that replicated U.S. outcomes. To further disseminate and examine the applicability of CPC-CBT in Sweden, an additional twenty agencies (80 therapists) were trained over the last four years to make CPC-CBT accessible to families across the country.

Thus far, more than 50 children and their parents completed pre and post treatment measures and six-month follow up. Preliminary results show significant reductions of trauma symptoms among children, depression among parents and use of coercive parenting strategies. Ongoing data collection including comparison data from families receiving treatment as usual in Sweden is underway and may be available for this presentation.

This is an example of transporting an EBT not only outside the developing clinic, but to another country. The presenters will provide an overview of CPC-CBT, supporting research conducted in the US, and outcomes associated with Sweden's pilot and large-scale dissemination projects. Lessons learned as well as strategies for overcoming therapists' skepticism, and cultural differences to promote successful implementation will be shared based on the experiences with CPC-CBT in the US and Sweden. Presentation will be interactive engaging audience to share their experiences and brainstorm additionalstrategies.

 

L7-b. Finding a Silver Lining in Every Cloud: Overcoming Challenges of Working with parents Who Physically Abuse

Cecilia Kjellgren, Doris Nilsson, Melissa Runyon, Johanna Thulin

Description

Evidence of an EBT creating positive outcomes for families after child physical abuse: Data describing children's treatment experiences in Sweden and strategies for overcoming clinical challenges.

Learning Objectives

  1. To educate professionals about the unique systemic and clinical challenges associated with working with families who are at-risk for child physical abuse and strategies for overcoming these challenges.
  2. To provide an overview of research examining children's accounts of their treatment experiences in Sweden after their participation in EBT.
  3. To educate professionals about strategies to safely and effectively work jointly with the traumatized child and parent who physically abused them.

Abstract

Children who experience physical abuse and the parents who abuse them is a population that presents mental health professionals with a unique set of challenges, particularly related to collaborating with systems, engagement of parents, and motivation to change parenting behavior.

Another challenge is navigating the therapeutic relationship of working with the child and parent jointly and the fear of retraumatizing the child, and whether or not to include the parent in the processing of the child's trauma narrative (story). Combined Parent Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT; Kjellgren et al., 2013; Runyon & Deblinger, 2014; Runyon et al., 2009; 2010), an evidence-based therapy including both the traumatized child and parent, was developed in the U.S. to address the needs of families who are at-risk for CPA and includes components to address these challenges.

As part of a large-scale dissemination project comparing CPC-CBT to treatment as usual in Sweden, a qualitative study was conducted to examine the experiences of 20 children after their participation in treatment. Preliminary analyses of the interviews identified a number of themes and subthemes, including what life was like before treatment, to tell about the abuse, to participate in treatment, my experiences of treatment, changes in the family, to advise a friend, and strategies if the violence reoccurs.

A very brief overview of CPC-CBT along with a review of supporting research will be provided to orient the audience. Presenters will share specific strategies relevant to all treatment models and specific CPC-CBT components that are utilized to increase collaboration among systems working with families, enhance parent engagement in treatment and motivate parents to change their behavior. Strategies for managing the therapeutic work with a traumatized child and the parent who abused the child will also be shared.

To illustrate how evidence-based therapy with this population can transform a seemingly hopeless situation into a very positive ending for children and families, qualitative data describing children's experiences of treatment, including the experience of processing their traumatic experiences will be described. Presentation will be interactive engaging audience to share their experiences and brainstorm additional strategies.

L8-a. Intimate Partner Violence Victimization: Implications for Child-Caregiver Attachment

Andrew Campbell

Description

Intimate partner violence victimization and its potential effects on child-caregiver attachments.

Learning Objectives

  1. To be able to discuss the many negative psychological effects of experiencing intimate partner violence.
  2. To be able to describe the specific threats intimate partner violence victimization poses to the development of strong child-caregiver attachments.
  3. To be able to identify potential protective factors to increase the likelihood of the development of a stronger level of attachment among children and adults victimized by intimate partner violence.

Abstract

This presentation will discuss the negative psychological effects of intimate partner violence victimization and related implications for child-caregiver attachments. At the conclusion of this presentation attendees will be able to discuss the negative psychological effects of experiencing intimate partner violence, be able to describe the specific threats intimate partner violence victimization poses to the development of strong child-caregiver attachments, and be able to identify potential protective factors to increase the likelihood of a stronger level of attachment among children and adults victimized by intimate partner violence.

To download workshop PDF: click here


L8-b. Mi Escuelita Therapeutic Preschool: Improving the Lives of Children Affected by Family Violence

Valerie Brew, Danielle L. Fettes, Pamela Wright

Description

Mi Escuelita is a cost-free, therapeutic preschool program, provided by South Bay Community Services, with successful social-emotional & educational outcomes for children with complex trauma histories.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the ways in which complex trauma manifests in young children with child welfare involvement.
  2. Discuss the collective impact that an early childhood intervention program has on over-time outcomes for children with complex trauma histories.
  3. Understand how trauma-informed programming emerges, is implemented, and sustains over time.

Abstract

This workshop will highlight several key features of an early childhood intervention program for children with complex trauma histories, rooted in severe family violence. Mi Escuelita is a cost-free, therapeutic, full-day preschool program provided by South Bay Community Services (SBCS), a multifaceted organization serving the South Bay area of San Diego County.

The Mi Escuelita program is tailored to the special needs of children, aged 3-5, with histories of family violence, child abuse and/or neglect, poverty, severe behavioral problems, and exposure to parental substance abuse and mental health issues, and who are at-risk for multiple disadvantages regarding downstream outcomes. Mi Escuelita offers a stimulating program incorporating evidence-based curricula and integrating multiple components, including clinical intakes and assessments, children's individual and group counseling, Healthy Development Services, and children's mental health services.

A rigorous evaluation study followed the children into their elementary years. Research findings highlight a single, notable pattern—children who participate in the Mi Escuelita program performed at least as well as, and in many circumstances better than, their peers on state and local indicators of academic achievement. Foremost, as Mi Escuelita is a program geared toward the school readiness of vulnerable children who face multiple overlapping risk factors, the evaluators found that the Mi Escuelita children consistently outperform, or perform at least as well as their peers, across each subject. Taken together, results demonstrate that the Mi Escuelita program provides clear benefits to children who may otherwise fall quickly and unsparingly behind with regard to school readiness.

We highlight that continued commitment to programs such as Mi Escuelita, and the value of collaborative partnerships, cannot be underplayed. A discussion will include how other communities may explore implementing similar programs.

To download workshop PDF: click here

L10. Developing a Collaborative Approach to Address the Opioid Crises

Jill Gresham

Description

The rate of opioid misuse and dependence is escalating in many communities. Child welfare systems are reporting increases in caseloads, primarily among infants and young children coming into care. Discerning the risk and safety factors associated with opioid use disorders is a difficult task faced by child welfare systems. This workshop session will provide an overview of the opioid crisis and explore implications for child welfare systems. Drawing on the recently published document A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Practice and Policy Considerations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical, and Service Providers and lessons learned from the Substance-Exposed Infants In-Depth Technical Assistance (SEI IDTA) project, this session will highlight strategies to build a collaborative approach in working with families affected by opioid use disorders.

Learning Objectives

  1. Gain an understanding of clinical standards of care for the treatment of opioid use disorders.
  2. Gain an understanding of policy and practice implications in working with families affected by opioid use disorders.
  3. Identify collaborative partnerships as necessary to best meeting needs of families affected by opioid use disorders; and strategies to facilitate a collaborative approach.

Abstract

The rate of opioid misuse and dependence is escalating in many communities. Child welfare systems are reporting increases in caseloads, primarily among infants and young children coming into care. Hospitals are reporting increases of infants born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. Substance use treatment systems are reporting increases in the number of individuals seeking treatment for opioid use disorders. This mixture of services systems often brings a considerable range and mix of approaches, affecting service coordination and sometimes further exacerbating the challenges faced by families. The decisions made by the various systems have far reaching impact on families. These decisions can include whether a parent is able to access the clinical standard of care for the treatment of opioid use disorders and determinations on a parent’s ability to safely care for their children.

Discerning the risk and safety factors associated with opioid use disorders is a difficult task faced by child welfare systems. The difficulty is associated with a range of issues that is often grounded in a lack of, or, misunderstanding of best practices in the treatment of opioid use disorders. Cases involving pregnant women and infants often add additional layers of complexity. Child welfare professionals are faced with making decisions on child safety in the context of the different situations involving parental opioid use. These situations can include parenting or pregnant parents who are:

  • Receiving pain management with medications under the care of a physician
  • Under the care of a physician and undergoing treatment for an opioid use disorder wh medications such as methadone or buprenorphine
  • Misusing or abusing opioid pain medications
  • Using or abusing illicit opioids, particularly heroin

Each of the previously described situations requires a thorough assessment of the strengths and potential risk and safety factors present in each case. A coordinated, multisystem approach that is grounded in early identification and intervention can assist child welfare in conducting both a comprehensive assessment and ensuring access to the range of services needed by families. 

Collaborative planning and implementation of services are yielding promising results in communities across the country.  This workshop session will provide an overview of the opioid crisis and explore implications for child welfare systems. Drawing on the recently published document A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Practice and Policy Considerations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical, and Service Providers and lessons learned from the Substance-Exposed Infants In-Depth Technical Assistance (SEI IDTA) project, this session will highlight efforts in building a collaborative response and explore strategies grounded in a collaborative approach.

To download workshop PDF: click here

L11. Engaging the Business Sector in Preventing Child Maltreatment

Sandra Alexander

Description

Business leaders and employers are beginning to recognize that their current success and a strong economic future depends on strategies that set children on the path to success beginning at birth and continuing throughout their lives.  This workshop will discuss how to make the case for prevention to business leaders and employers.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand why business is an important prevention partner.
  2. Understand how to make the business case for prevention.
  3. Learn about specific examples of how business can support safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments for children and families in their workplace and in their community.

Abstract

Successful prevention requires a comprehensive strategies and the engagement of high leverage sectors that have not always been involved. The business sector is a non-traditional prevention partner that can play an important role in promoting safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments for children and families. Business leaders and employers are beginning to recognize that their current success and a strong economic future depends on strategies that set children on the path to success beginning at birth and continuing throughout their lives. Investments in strategies and policies that promote safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments for today's children can increase a business competitive advantage, improve their bottom line and have broader societal impacts, including preventing child abuse and neglect.

This workshop will discuss making the case for prevention to business leaders and employers. It will include how child maltreatment affects business, how business thinks, how to frame our outreach to them in a way that is consistent with their professional or personal priorities, key actions business can take and specific examples of how one business is providing a supportive, family friendly workplace.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Anda RF, Fleisher VI, Felitti VJ, Edwards VJ, Whitfield CL, Dube SR, Williamson DF. Childhood abuse, household dysfunction, and indicators of impaired adult worker performance. The Permanente Journal 2004; 8(1): 30-38.
  • Schofield T, Lee R, Merrick M. Safe, stable, nurturing relationships as a moderator of intergenerational continuity of child maltreatment: A meta-analysis. Journal of Adolescent Health 2013; 53: S32-S38.
  • Hair NL. Hanson JL, Wolfe BL, Pollak SD. Association of child poverty, brain development, and academic achievement [published online July 20, 2015]. JAMA Pediatr. Doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1475.

L14. Using Data for Shaping Domestic Violence Prosecutorial Decision Making

Tracy Prior, Terra Marroquin, Julie Wartell

Description

How data analysis can effect prosecution efforts in domestic violence (DV) cases.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the value of data collection and analysis to inform and focus prosecutorial efforts.
  2. Recognize how the use of evidence-based models can assist in effecting protocols and policies by criminal justice organizations.
  3. Appreciate the importance of developing collaborative partnerships between criminal justice and social services to effect systems improvements.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

M1. Fractures in Child Abuse: Clinical Correlation Recommended

Lori Frasier

Description

Info to come.

To download workshop Handout: click here

To download workshop PDF: click here

M2. Food for Thought on Failure-to-Thrive

Suzanne Starling

Description

Info to come.

To download workshop PDF: click here

M3. The Amazing Adolescent Brain

Linda Chamberlain

Description

The adolescent brain is a work-in-progress that poses unique risks and opportunities. Brain-based approaches to enhance communication and promote healthy development will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify three major changes that are occurring in the adolescent brain.
  2. Explain how alcohol affects the adolescent brain differently compared to a mature adult brain.
  3. Describe two strategies for communicating more effectively with teens.

Abstract

Purpose:
The purpose of this presentation is to help participants recognize that the adolescent brain is a work-in-progress. Dr. Chamberlain begins with an overview of the building blocks of the brain to demonstrate how adolescence is a critical window of opportunity in brain development. Using visual aids, she focuses attention on the areas of the brain that show the most profound changes during adolescence and engages participants to understand how these changes influence adolescents' emotions, learning, decision-making, and behaviors as well as their enhanced vulnerability to
alcohol and other potential neurotoxins.

Desired Outcomes:
That participants will be able to apply this science in daily practice to improve communication with adolescents and identify and implement brain-based strategies that will enhance the effectiveness of services and policies.

M4. Child Interviewing 2017: Update on Research and Practice

Thomas Lyon

Description

A review of the latest research with case studies of how the research can best be put to use in practice.

 

M5. Shaken Baby Syndrome: An Investigator's Perspective

Craig Smith

Description

Understanding medical terms and mechanisms of injury. Identifying the perpetrator and developing investigative timelines.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will learn how to conduct an Abusive Head Trauma/Shaken Baby Syndrome (AHT/SBS) investigation that will correctly identify the offender along with the time of the offence.
  2. Attendees will learn how to conduct an initial interview of caregivers in order to get them "tied" to details in a particular story. Comparing the details against the research based medical evidence will often differentiate the innocent caregiver from the abuser.
  3. Participants will also be encouraged to use a multi-disciplinary approach with police, social workers, medical personnel and prosecutors, in conducting a thorough investigation.

Abstract

This presentation will focus on the law enforcement investigation of (AHT/SBS) cases. Two major obstacles facing investigators are identifying the perpetrator and confirming the actual mechanism and timing of the injury.

Biomechanical research has now developed a clear picture of the mechanism of injury and the degree of force used in this form of child abuse. The research has also revealed that the onset of symptoms in serious injury or fatal cases is immediate. This session will use medical based, animated graphics and case histories to show how this research can be translated by non-medical, investigators and will present techniques that can be used to correctly identify the person responsible for injuring the child. In these investigations false alibi statements by caregivers, can often be as useful as partial or even full admissions.

Participants will learn how to conduct an initial interview of suspects in order to get them "tied" to a particular story. Scene examination, gathering of corroborative evidence, liaison with medical and legal experts and interviewing of suspects will all be topics of discussion during this presentation

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (2015). Understanding Abusive Head Trauma in Infants and Children.
  • Canadian Paediatric Society (2007). Multidisciplinary Guidelines on the Identification, Investigation and Management of Suspected Abusive Head Trauma. Ottawa.
  • Nakagawa, T. & Conway, E. (2004) Shaken Baby Syndrome: Recognizing and Responding to a Lethal Danger. Contemporary Pediatrics. March 2004. Vol 21, No 3.

M6. Proving Child Abuse in Court: Investigation to Verdict, Part 3

Thomas J. Fallon, John Myers, Paul Stern

Description

This session discusses effective use of expert testimony, including direct and cross-examination.

Learning Objectives

  1. Increase knowledge and skill in investigation of child abuse.
  2. Increase knowledge and skill in prosecution of child abuse.
  3. Increase knowledge and skill regarding expert testimony in child abuse cases.

Abstract

This three-part workshop provides practical guidance on successful investigation and prosecution of physical and sexual abuse.

Part 1: covers investigation, including forensic interviewing of victims, witnesses, and suspects.

Part 2: addresses evidence issues at trial, including hearsay and Crawford, forfeiture by wrongdoing, character evidence, uncharged misconduct evidence, impeachment, and child witnesses.

Part 3: discusses effective use of expert testimony, including direct and cross-examination. The workshops build on each other, but each stands on its own, so one could attend all three, or pick and choose. This workshop will be valuable for the novice or expert investigator or litigator. The goal is to equip attendees with the latest developments in case law, research, and trial technique.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Paul Stern, Preparing and Presenting Expert Testimony in Child Abuse Litigation (1997).
  • John E.B. Myers, Myers on Evidence of Interpersonal Violence: Child Maltreatment, Intimate Partner Violence, Rape, Stalking, and Elder Abuse (6th ed. 2016).

M7-a. Prevalence of Victimization and Poly-Victimization of Children in Saudi Arabia: Results from a Child Abuse Screening Tools Study

Majid Al-Eissa

Description

Multiple forms of victimization (poly-victimization) can occur during childhood resulting harmful effects on health and difficult to reverse.

Learning Objectives

  1. To determine the prevalence of victimization and poly-victimization among secondary school students in Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Objectives: Multiple forms of victimization (poly-victimization) can occur during childhood resulting harmful effects on health and difficult to reverse. Previous studies focused on individual, relatively narrow categories of victimization (e.g. psychological abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing family violence), paying less attention to exposure to poly-victimization. Most studies of poly-victimization have been conducted in the United States and in northern European countries. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of victimization and poly-victimization among secondary school students in Saudi Arabia.

Methods: A cross-sectional, national survey utilizing ISPCAN Child Abuse Screening Tool Children's Version (ICAST-CH), supported by a grant from King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) was conducted in secondary schools in the five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Boys and girls, public and private schools were selected to participate. Students (N=16,010) aged 15-18 years were invited to complete the survey.

Results: Participant's mean age 16.8±0.9 years, and 51% boys. Eighty one percent lived with both-parents, 6.2% with single parent, and 2.5% with step-parent. Most of the participants (89%) reported at least one type of victimization during their lives and 87% during the last year. Psychological abuse (79%) was the most common type of abuse followed by physical abuse (62%), neglect (53%), and sexual abuse (13%). Participants reported an average of 3.5±1.3 victimizations during their lives and 3.2±1.3 victimizations during the last year. Approximately 47% of the sample was considered as poly-victims (experienced 4-6 victimizations) during their lives and 38% during the last year. Poly-victimization was found to be higher in girls, 17-18 years, and living with step-parent (p< 0.05).

Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of establishing public policy which encourages the social workers and Child Protection Services to screen poly-victimization in cases of suspected child maltreatment.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Victimization and Polyvictimization of Spanish Youth Involved in Juvenile Justice. Pereda N, Abad J, Guilera G. J Interpers Violence. 2015 Jul 30. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence. Andrews AR 3rd, Jobe-Shields L, López CM, Metzger IW, de Arellano MA, Saunders B, Kilpatrick DG. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1223-34.
  • Polyvictimization and victimization of children and youth: Results from a populational survey. Cyr K, Chamberland C, Clément MÈ, Lessard G, Wemmers JA, Collin-Vézina D, Gagné MH, Damant D. Child Abuse Negl. 2013 Oct;37(10):814-20.

M7-b. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network Child Welfare Practice Laboratory: A Collaborative Evaluation of a Resource Parent Curriculum for Trauma-Informed Parenting

Jane Halladay Goldman

Description

This workshop will describe the NCTSN Child Welfare Practice Laboratory and its use to implement and evaluate the NCTSN Resource Parent Curriculum – a workshop series for trauma-informed parenting.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will understand the collaborative method of evaluation used to implement and evaluate the NCTSN Resource Parent Curriculum.
  2. Participants will be able to identify the key components of the curriculum and discuss successful implementation techniques.
  3. Participants will be able to summarize key findings in the evaluation of this trauma-informed curricula for resource parents.

Abstract

The Child Welfare Committee of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) commenced a new initiative, the Child Welfare Practice Laboratory (CWPL), with goals to

  1. create and strengthen partnerships between child welfare agencies and mental health agencies,
  2. collaborate to launch best practices for helping traumatized children and families, and
  3. evaluate those best practices with a view towards widespread implementation in child welfare systems across the U.S. 

The first project was an evaluation of the NCTSN workshop series, Caring for Children Who Have Experienced Trauma: A Workshop for Resource Parents (RPC), which focuses on trauma-informed parenting.

The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the efficacy of the RPC to affect trauma-informed perspectives of parents measured by changes in

  1. parenting self-efficacy;
  2. perceptions regarding the reasons for their child's misbehavior (i.e. attribution); and
  3. intentions to remain a foster or kinship giver. 

A secondary purpose was to determine whether variance in curriculum implementation across the 10 locations influenced the degree of change in any of these three areas.

This workshop will describe the method of using the CWPL to implement, evaluate, and scale-up best practices for trauma-informed child welfare systems.  Attendees will also learn about the RPC, an effective and well-received curricula for helping resource parents understand trauma-informed parenting.  Finally the findings of the collaborative evaluation will be presented with a discussion of their implications for child welfare and mental health agencies who might implement the RPC.

The results of this study are not yet published, but other research is beginning to compliment the widespread anecdotal support of the utility of trauma-informed practices within child welfare systems (Bartlett, et.al. 2015; Fraser, et.al. 2014; Kramer, 2013).

M8. Relationships Matter: Preventing Childhood Maltreatment by Promoting Changes from Within
Stories from Public Health Nurses

Casey Johnson, Janette Wolski-Bonesteel

Description

Public Health Nurses (PHNs) will be presenting information on the MCH and NFP home visiting programs. PHNs work with pregnant and parenting caregivers to prevent child maltreatment and promote positive relationships.

Learning Objectives

  1. Attendees will be able to describe the role of PHNs.
  2. Attendees will be able to name at least 2 tools PHNs use during home visits that relate to decreasing child maltreatment.
  3. Attendees will have increased knowledge on what happens during home visits.

Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to educate attendees on the value of public health nursing home visits in decreasing child maltreatment. This is done through research-based tools and nursing standards of practice. Desired outcomes are for attendees to have increased knowledge about the role of PHNs.

To download workshop PDF: click here

M10. So How Do You Know They Are Ready for Reunification? Key Considerations for Assessing Families in Recovery

Russ Bermejo

Description

This workshop presentation will explore the impact of parental substance use on the on the parent-child relationship and the essential service components needed to address these issues, including ensuring quality visitation and contact, implementation of evidence-based services, therapeutic services and access to ongoing family recovery support. This workshop discussion will explore family readiness as a collaborative practice issue by raising the need for coordinated case plans and effective communication protocols across child welfare, treatment and court systems.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the impact of parental substance use on the parent-child relationship and the essential service components needed to address these issues.
  2. Understand family readiness as a collaborative practice issue and why “team” is just as important as any “tool” for assessing readiness.
  3. Learn various case management strategies, including implementation of quality visitation and contact, evidence-based services, coordinated case plans and effective communication protocols across child welfare, treatment and court systems.

Abstract

The accountable, time-limited mandate for achieving permanency for children set forth in the 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) drove the demand for a better and coordinated system response to meet the needs of families affected by parental substance use.

This workshop presentation will explore the impact of parental substance use on the parent-child relationship and describe the essential service components needed to facilitate reunification and strengthening the parent-child relationship. Essential elements such as ensuring quality visitation and contact, implementation of evidence-based services inclusive of parent education, therapeutic services and access to ongoing family recovery support will be highlighted.

This workshop discussion will explore family readiness as a collaborative practice issue by raising the need for coordinated case plans and effective communication protocols across child welfare, treatment and court systems. Discussion will explore different program designs across sites including the timing and phasing of reunification, family maintenance supervision and case termination.

To download workshop PDF: click here

M13. Comparison of Structure, Purpose, and Policies of Child Protection Systems in Colorado and the Netherlands

Richard Krugman, Francien Lamers-Winkelman, Laura Schwab Reese

Description

An In-Depth Comparison of the Structure, Purpose, and Policies of Child Protective Systems in Colorado and The Netherlands.

Learning Objectives

  1. Compare how the child protection systems have evolved over time and the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach.
  2. Assess the role, the benefits, and the costs of mandatory reporting in each system.
  3. Identify outcome evaluation methods from other health fields and propose application of these approaches to outcome evaluation of child protective systems.

Abstract

Child protection systems (CPS) in The Netherlands and the US have historically differed in structure and function. Originally, the European system was health based, while the child protective system in the US was child welfare based. These systems have evolved significantly during the past 25 years, although not necessarily in the same direction.  We conducted a qualitative study with administrators and front-line workers in the two countries, focusing on Colorado in the US. Analysis of the differences in system structure, function, policies, and evolution may provide an opportunity to learn from the strengths and weakness of each.

To download workshop PDF: click here

M14. Child Protector: A Smartphone App Decision Tool for Medical and Investigative Personnel

Terra Frazier, Emily Killough, Monica Nielsen-Parker

Description

Using a free smart phone app, this interactive session will use animations and decision-trees to improve medical providers' capacity to understand and teach child injury forensics and decision-making.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to use a smartphone app to teach small and large groups of learners.
  2. Participants will be able to utilize Child Protector in cases of possible child physical abuse.
  3. Participants will be able to utilize Child Protector as a tool to educate medical learners.

Abstract

In 2011, the "Mechanisms of Injury in Childhood" smartphone app and CD-ROM were created to improve the teaching capabilities of medically-based educators regarding physical abuse. The program contained advanced animations of mechanisms of accidental and inflicted injuries, along with narration, to demonstrate the characteristics of childhood injuries. Recently, the "Child Protector" smart phone app was developed to update the Mechanisms of Injury in Childhood program with new animations and medical and investigative decision-trees, and is available as a free app in the Apple and Android stores. Child Protector incorporates decision-making aides to assist in the medical and investigative approach to bruises, burns, head injuries, fractures, and abdominal injuries. This free app provides an on-demand educational resource for medical professionals who teach other investigative or medical professionals.

Presenters will demonstrate how the app works using real cases; medical and investigative information will be entered into the app's branching logic, with resulting recommendations. Attendees may locate and download the app, following along with the presenters in case-based presentations, and learn how to use their smartphones as teaching devices for both a small group and a larger audience.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Anderst J, Dowd MD. Comparative needs in child abuse education and resources: perceptions from three medical specialties. Medical Education Online. 2010; 15: 5193 - DOI: 10.3402/meo.v15i0.5193
  • Anderst, J., Kellogg, N., & Jung, I. (2009). Is the diagnosis of physical abuse changes when Child Protective Services consults a Child Abuse Pediatrics subspecialty group as a second opinion? Child Abuse & Neglect, 33, 481-489.
  • Goad, J. (2008). Understanding Roles and Improving Reporting and Response Relationships Across Professional Boundaries. Pediatrics, 122;S6 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2008-0715d.

 

 

N17-a. Danger and Risks of Youth Using Technology

Joe Laramie, Ronald Laney

Description

This Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) focused training will discuss types of technology used, including social media, smartphones and other forms of electronic communication by offenders, including juveniles and child victims.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify technology used by child sexual abuse and exploitation offenders and victims.
  2. Describe types of offenders who use technology to connect with victis.
  3. Describe methods of evidence collection and corroboration across the Multi-DisciplinarTeam.

Abstract

This training will focus on a Multi-Disciplinary Team approach to the collection and corroboration of digital evidence for cases of child abuse and exploitation.  Discussion on the types of technology used, including social media, smartphones and other forms of electronic communication by offenders, including juveniles and child victims.

To download a zipped folder of workshop PDFs: click here

N17-b. A Family Perspective

Mika Moulton, Ronald Laney

Description

Listen first hand to the real perception and feelings from a mother that has lived through every parent's worst nightmare.

Learning Objectives

  1. Don't Assume You can understand.
  2. Listen.
  3. It's okay if you cry too.

Abstract

This presentation dispels the prevailing misconceptions surrounding the way society and professionals view a parent that has a missing child. The presenter will provide a firsthand account of the psychological trauma and dangers often faced by parents of missing children.

N17-c. Honor and Partner Violence Among Hindustani and the Intergenerational Transference

Danielle Kretz, Anita Nanhoe

Description

An explorative study on the role of honor and forced marriages in partner violence among Hindustani and the possibility of prevention.

Learning Objectives

  1. Become familiair with Dutch policy and infrastructure on domestic violence and honor based violence.
  2. Learn about mechanisms involved with marital captivity (a dimension of honor based violence).
  3. Learn about mechanisms involved with the intergenerational transference of honor based mechanisms related to marital captivity.

Abstract

The Netherlands has made large steps since the founding of the first private women shelter in 1974. Nowadays women shelters are subsidized by the Dutch government. In 2002 domestic violence officially became part of the political and social agenda in the Netherlands. A national infrastructure was built within a few years with attention for prevention, protection and criminal prosecution. In the Netherlands honor based violence (HBV) is increasingly recognized as a complex manifestation of domestic violence with many known and unknown mechanisms and differences between cultures and subcultures. A special national and regional infrastructure is organized to work on HBV-cases. The Netherlands keeps moving forward when it comes to the policy on domestic violence and honor based violence.

We briefly present the policy and the infrastructure in the Netherlands. After that we present this study that deals with the question 'Do honor based mechanisms influence partner violence among Surinamese Hindustani in the Netherlands? And what can we say about the intergenerational transference? Available research mainly focuses on forced marriages and on honor killings, also mainly among Muslim women. Little is known on marital captivity and on honor based violence within non-Muslim groups. This research shows the honor based mechanisms involved with marital captivity of Surinamese Hindustani women in the Netherlands who experienced partner violence. The research starts with relevant honor based mechanisms in the upbringing; continues with the habitual (and often unconscious and/or unintended) organization of power relations within family life through marriage; and ends with the intergenerational transference of honor based mechanisms as a dimension of the power of habits. We also present some implications for policy.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

To download workshop PDF: click here

N17-d. How Homophobic Are You? Effects of Implicit Bias on LGBTQ Youth

Gary Bevel, Esq.

Description

This session examines conscious and unconscious bias; impacts of overt bias, silence and inaction; and strategies to safely interrupt biased behavior.

N17-e. Research to Practice: Hot Topics for Multidisciplinary Teams

Karen Hangartner

Description

Child abuse professionals on MDTs need some working knowledge of research findings related to child abuse and how those findings may affect the investigation. This specific information is seldom, if ever, included in their discipline-specific professional preparation and development. In this workshop, we explore several "hot" topics and related research and implications for professionals' practice.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore research and practice implications related to teen sexual violence.
  2. Explore research and practice implications related to children with problematic sexual behaviors.
  3. Explore research and practice implications for children's trauma responses.

Abstract

Child abuse professionals on MDTs need some working knowledge of research findings related to child abuse and how those findings may affect the investigation. This specific information is seldom, if ever, included in their discipline-specific professional preparation and development. There are several topics that directly impact decisions made during the course of an investigation and may affect recommendations for interventions. In this workshop, we explore several "hot" topics and related research and implications for professionals' practice.

N17-f. Managing a Trauma Mental Health Program for Non-Mental Health Leaders: New NCA and NCTSN Tool Kit for CAC Directors

Teresa Huizar, Charles Wilson

Description

Non-mental health professionals sometimes find themselves overseeing a mental health program within their broader organization, as is common among child advocacy centers. The session will provide guidance on what critical areas a leader should focus their attention upon and how to use a series of new web based NCA and NCTSN tools to help leaders implement quality trauma mental health services in the real world environment.

To download workshop PDF: click here

N17-g. Mental Health Impact of Racism and Racial Injustices That Perpetuate Disparities

Elizabeth Thompson

Description

Explore thoughts and feelings around issues raised.

N17-h. When the Criminal Case is Over: Finding Justice Through the Civil Courts in Cases of Institutional Based Sexual Abuse

Stephen Estey, Ed Semansky

Description

How we can effect change by holding institutions (who fail to protect children from being sexually abused) accountable in our civil justice system.

Learning Objectives

  1. How we can effect change via verdicts in civil justice system.
  2. Differences between criminal and civil justice systems in relation to childhood sex abuse victims.
  3. How civil case can be therapeutic for sex abuse victims.

Abstract

The purpose of this seminar is to highlight how obtaining a large verdict against an institution which failed to protect a child from being sexually abused can effect change. History has shown that large corporations don't take issues seriously until it effects their bottom line. When a large verdict is obtained against a company that company (and that industry) will change the way it operates in order to avoid more financial exposure in the future. Theoretically, this should make our children safer in the future. We would like the participants in this seminar learn that there are options for a sex abuse survivor after the criminal case against the perpetrator is completed. In other words, if an institution failed to protect him/her from a sexual predator then he/she can possibly hold that institution accountable via the civil justice system. By bringing a civil suit in this regard we can put the shame back where it belongs.

N17-i. Acting Now on the Best Available Evidence to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect

Beverly Fortson

Description

Discussion of a select set of strategies and specific approaches that can create the context for healthy children and families and prevent child abuse and neglect.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain what a technical package is and how it can help advance public health prevention efforts.
  2. Describe evidence-based child maltreatment prevention strategies.
  3. Decide where to begin with prevention activities to have maximal impact based on community needs.

Abstract

Child abuse and neglect is a serious public health issue with far-reaching consequences for the youngest and most vulnerable members of society. Every child in the United States is better when he/she and his/her peers have safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. Thus, we all have a vested interest inensuring that other children, not just our own, have safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments.

This presentation will focus on a technical package developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which aims to provide information that will be helpful in identifying and implementing prevention activities with the greatest potential to reduce child abuse and neglect. The presentation will include a discussion of strategies and approaches that ideally would be used in combination in a multilevel, multi-sector approach to prevent child abuse and neglect. The strategies and approaches are in keeping with CDC's emphasis on primary prevention (i.e., preventing abuse and neglect from happening in the first place), as well as approaches to lessen the short- and long-term harms of child abuse and neglect.

Each of the strategies and approaches is supported by research that directly reduces child abuse and neglect or reduces the risk factors. In addition to the discussion of strategies and approaches for preventing child abuse and neglect, we will share information on which sectors are well positioned to bring leadership and resources to implementation efforts, as well as information on the importance of monitoring and evaluation. While child abuse and neglect is a significant public health problem, it is also a preventable one. The policy, norm, and programmatic strategies and approaches that will be discussed are intended to help guide the creation of neighborhoods and communities where every child has safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments and a world where every child can thrive.

To download workshop PDF: click here

N17-j. No Hit Zone

Randell Alexander, Amy Brown, Barbara Knox, Ismael Ozanne, Deb Sendek

Description

No hit zones are spreading in hospital and non-hospital settings. Examples of no hit zones will be illustrated in a hospital, prosecutor's office, and in one city's buildings.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe what is a no hit zone.
  2. Give examples of no hit zones in different settings.
  3. Name a national goal for no hit zones.

Abstract

Changing the social norms to help prevent physical abuse may mean changing the norms about corporal punishment. At least 50 countries have achieved this by banning corporal punishment within their borders. However in the US, a more local strategy of establishing no hit zones may change attitudes in much the same way that no smoking areas have.

This session will discuss no hit zones and give examples of how they have been implemented in a hospital, prosecutor's office, and in one city's buildings. The national strategy is to have all children's hospitals be no hit zones.
From there, no hit zones need to spread to governmental, agency, and commercial settings.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics