Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Additional information will be added as it becomes available. Please check back.


Sharon Cooper, MDWELCOME / PLENARY SESSION
Making the Invisible: Dare to See and Dare to Act!

Maiike Brunekreef, Lonneke Buijteweg, Jeroen van de Ven

Description

Emotional abuse: an inspirational talk and film about how we can change our mindset to see, hear, and talk about this invisible abuse.


Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how to increase awareness of emotional neglect and abuse.
  2. Learn how to act on signs of neglect and abuse.
  3. Learn about the professional and personal development.
  4. Learn how to overcome professional dilemmas.

Abstract

Many healthcare professionals are aware of the visible signs of physical child abuse, elder abuse and domestic violence. But looking at the statistics, we know that emotional neglect and abuse are still huge hidden problems and they are even bigger than physical abuse. In The Netherlands, in each school class one child is subject to abuse.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

A15-a. Developing a National Child Protection Policy in a Resource Constrained Context: Challenges and Process

Joan van Niekerk

Description

The paper describes the process and challenges encountered when developing a national child care and protection policy in post-apartheid South Africa. It emphases the importance of broadly based consultation across all role-players in child care and protection – the particular relevance of which is amplified by South Africa’s apartheid history during which the majority of the population lacked any participation in national governance and policy making. in a developing country context cognizance must be taken of ensuring that the policy is implementable from a financial perspective, as well as balances all levels of prevention – primary, secondary and tertiary, as well as the need to comply with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the child.

Learning Objectives

  1. To create an understanding the importance and process of balancing rights based perspectives with political and civil society agendas when developing policy.
  2. To provide insights into methodologies for ensuring broadly based participation into policy. Development relating to children.
  3. To provide information on the policy outcomes.
  4. To discuss advocacy as a tool to achieve a policy that reflects the lived experiences of children.

A15-b. Child-Focused Joint Investigation of Child Abuse Cases: 20 Years' Experience in Hong Kong, Part 1

Kindy Yuk Ip Lam, Frances King Hei Lee, Nancy Ching Yee Chow, Sook Yee Chang-Lam

Description

With 20 years' effort, the Hong Kong model of joint investigation, interviewing protocol and witness support with an aim to balancing the legal justice and child's interests has developed a child-centered, multi-disciplinary and case manager approach successfully.

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the background and practice of joint investigation of child abuse cases in Hong Kong.
  2. To learn the important ingredients of the good practice of joint investigation and video-recorded interviews with child witnesses in criminal proceedings.
  3. To understand the joint departmental training strategies on joint investigation and video-recorded interview.

Abstract

Hong Kong has been adopting a child-centred, multi-disciplinary and case manager approach to combat child abuse. In 1995, ordinances were amended to allow special measures to better protect children in criminal and court proceedings. For example, video-recorded interview with child witness are admissible to court for trial to replace the evidence-in-chief. Live TV link can be arranged for child witnesses to give evidence in court with the companion of a support person.

To enhance the protection of the child's interests during the investigation process, designated units in the Hong Kong Police Force have been set up while the manpower of specialized units in the Social Welfare Department have been strengthened. The police, government social workers, and, if applicable, clinical psychologists join hands in the investigation of serious cases such as intra-familial and organized sexual abuse cases and serious physical abuse cases for the whole process from receiving reports of child abuse to court proceedings. Video-recorded investigative interviews are also jointly conducted by trained police and government social worker/clinical psychologist according to the need of child witnesses, e.g. age, mental capability, etc.

With 20 years' effort, the Hong Kong model of joint investigation, interviewing protocol and witness support with an aim to balancing the legal justice and child's interests has been developed successfully. We would like to illustrate in this workshop our good practice using an intra-familial sexual abuse case. Strategies in joint departmental training for investigators and interviewers as well as for developing local trainers will also be highlighted. With the ever changing societal circumstances, new challenges in child protection, e.g. those being sexually exploited in compensated dating and production of indecent images, those with special needs and from different cultures, etc. will also be discussed.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Tsui, E., Lam, K. & Cheung, S.L. (2002, June). Investigative interviewing of child witness in Hong Kong: an Asian adaptation of British and American practice. Paper presented at the Investigative Psychology 7th International Conference, University of Liverpool, UK.
  • Chang Lam, S. Y. (2010, June). Understanding and handling child sexual abuse reports (in Chinese language). Presented and published in Ten-year Anniversary cum Academic Conference held by the Anti-Domestic Violence Network of the China Law Society, Beijing.
  • Cheung, K. M. (1997). Developing the interview protocol for video recorded child sexual abuse investigations: A training experience with police officers, social workers and clinical psychologists in Hong Kong. Child Abuse & Neglect, 21(3), 273–284.
To download workshop PDF: click here

A15-c. 10 Years of Advocacy on Child Abuse and Neglect by Chiild and Addolescent Psychiatrists

Alfons Crijnen, Ariëlle de Ruijter, Irma Hein, Marie-José van Hoof

Description

Psychiatrists and the Dutch Knowledge Center advocated against abuse and neglect through research, a website for patients and professionals, presentations for professionals, and through advocacy at the political and legal arena.

Learning Objectives

  1. The importance of collaboration in the advocacy against child abuse and neglect.
  2. The role of child and adolescent psychiatrists in the prevention and treatment of abuse and neglect.
  3. Examples of different ways of successfully raising awareness by child psychiatrists for the prevention and treatment of abuse and neglect.

Abstract

An expert group of child and adolescent psychiatrists proactively advocated for reducing child abuse and neglect as well as for trauma treatment in close collaboration with the Dutch Knowledge Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (http://www.kenniscentrum-kjp.nl) since 2007. The experts gathered all scientific, legal and practical information about prevention, diagnostic procedures, treatment, and the policies on child abuse and neglect, and made this knowledge base available to the general public as well as to their professional colleagues.
Advocacy addressed the following fields which will be discussed in the interactive session:

  • The Dutch Knowledge Center provides unique opportunities for the dissemination of information and the advocacy of child and adolescent psychiatry by engaging a broad network. Examples will be given about the collaboration with Dutch experts, about the opportunities for advocacy, and about the policies the Center uses to bring together the psychiatric professionals.
  • The experts increased professional and societal awareness by informing professionals in the legal, administrative and political field about consequences of legal procedures, and made a plea for finances for the prevention and treatment of abuse and neglect, etc.
  • The experts presented as a group on national and international psychiatric conferences about relevant topics concerning e.g. the primary prevention of abuse, screening for safety in families, attachment and trauma, etc.
  • With the influx of a large number of traumatized refugee children in recent years the importance of trauma-focused approach in the organization of mental health care for this specific population was advocated.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Hein, I. Children's competence to consent to medical treatment or research (Dissertation). Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam (2015)
  • Mejdoubi J. et al. Effect of Nurse Home Visits vs. Usual Care on reducing intimate partner violence in young high-risk women: a randomized controlled trial. Plos One 2013: 8.10: e78185.
  • Mejdoubi J. et al. The effect of VoorZorg, the Dutch Nurse Family Partnership, on child maltreatment and development: a randomized controlled trial. Plos One, 2015: DOI 10.1371; e0120182.

A15-d. Age at Sexual Debut. Does It Matter?

Asa Kastbom

Description

The time for sexual debut matters. An early sexual debut (13 years or younger) is associated with risk behaviors and adolescents with a late sexual debut seem to live a more stable and cautious life than their peers with an early sex debut.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn more about early sex debut.
  2. Learn more about late sex debut.
  3. Learn about association between abuse and time of sexual debut.

Abstract

Background: Empirical research about late sexual debut and its consequences is limited why further research is needed.

Objective: To explore how students who had not had intercourse by the age of 18 differed in terms of sociodemographic factors, physical and psychological health, sexual behavior and history of sexual abuse from those who had.

Study design and methodology: This is a cross-sectional survey involving 3,380 Swedish 18 year olds.
Descriptive analyses were used to investigate different types of sexual behavior. Ordinal data concerning alcohol consumption, self-esteem, sexual and physical abuse, parental relationships, sense of coherence and health were analyzed and multiple regression was carried out to identify the most important factors associated with no sexual debut.

Results: Just under a quarter of the adolescents had not had oral, anal or vaginal sex by the age of 18 and they comprised the index group. They were characterized by being more likely to have caring fathers, parents born outside Europe, lower pornography consumption, lower alcohol and tobacco consumption, less antisocial behavior and above all lower sexual desire (sometimes aOR=3.8, never/seldom aOR=13.3) and fewer experiences of sexual abuse (aOR=25.5). Family structure and culture matters when it comes to the age of sexual debut.

Conclusion: Adolescents with no sexual debut at 18 years of age seemed to live a more stable and
cautious life than more sexual experienced peers exemplified by fewer antisocial acts, less smoking and alcohol/drug consumption, less sexual desire and less experience of sexual abuse.

To download workshop PDF: click here

A15-e. The Value of Histology in Forensic Pediatric Pathology

Vidija Soerdjbalie-Maikoe

Description

Misinterpretation of an accessory suture as a fracture has significant implications. An accessory suture, a rare entity, might not be differentiated from a fracture only by radiology.

Learning Objectives

  1. Histology is an unavoidable necessity in forensic autopsy.
  2. Accessory skull suture is rarely and pose a diagnostic challenge in SUDI.
  3. Be aware of adverse consequences in case of misdiagnosis.

Abstract

Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI) is any infant death that is sudden, unexpected and initially unexplained [1]. SUDI is a diagnostic challenge for health care professionals, whereby a multidisciplinary approach is indicated. Post-mortem radiology is established as an important auxiliary tool within such an approach. It is therefore advised to perform a radiological skeletal survey in all deceased children younger than four years of age (2). In the presented case, an accessory suture of the parietal bone was initially interpreted as a fracture during post-mortem radiological survey. Since such a misdiagnosis has significant adverse consequences, any health care professional or forensic specialist dealing with paediatric mechanical trauma should be aware of the existence of such rare anomalies. This article provides information on the incidence, aetiology and diagnosis of accessory skull sutures. Accessory skull sutures are rarely encountered anomalies that may pose a diagnostic challenge, especially when encountered in the context of sudden unexpected death in infancy. Misinterpretation of an accessory suture as a fracture has significant implications for parents, caregivers and society. An accessory suture might not be differentiated from a fracture on the basis of radiological findings only. In forensic contexts, autopsy including histological analysis is an unavoidable necessity. In clinical contexts, a careful follow-up is indicated.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Could SJ. Sudden Unexpected death in infancy. Current Diagnostic Pathology 2001. 7(1).
  • Sudden unexpected death in infancy, a multi-agency protocol for care and investigation. The Royal College of Pathologists and The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

B1. Sexually Transmitted Infections in Child and Adolescent Sexual Abuse and Assault

Sandra Murray

Description

This session will discuss diagnosis, treatment and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in cases of sexual abuse/assault.

To download workshop PDF: click here

B2. Assessing the Risk for Suicide and Self-Harm in Youth: What You Should Know—Part 1

Jeffrey Rowe

Description

Part I: this presentation will discuss Suicide and Self-Harm from the perspectives of risks, signs and symptoms, reasons people harm themselves, and where interventions can be helpful. Included will be data about first-time suicidal behavior, high-risk populations, factors that increase the likelihood of the suicidal behavior occurring, and signs and symptoms that indicate suicidal behavior is imminent. In addition, risks and reason for Self-Harmful behavior will be presented.

Part 2 (D2): tools, techniques, and methods used to clinically identify and rate the immediate risk of a youth.

Learning Objectives

  1. Be able to identify factors that identify populations of people who have a high-risk of suicide and who would benefit from a public health oriented suicide prevention intervention.
  2. Be able to identify factors that indicate a person’s current presentation of symptoms make them an imminent risk for suicidal behavior.
  3. Be able to discuss the relative merits of a primary prevention model versus a secondary prevention model of intervention when determining how to decrease to occurrence of suicidal behavior.

B3. Collaborating to Create Resources for Children's Advocacy Centers: Children With Sexual Behavior Problems

Michelle Miller, Jane Silovsky, Corey Brodsky,  Elizabeth Ciesar

Description

As part of the National Children’s Alliance ongoing work to develop helpful tools and guidance to CACs on best practices, a collaborative workgroup was developed on the subject of Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems. This is a growing area of concern to CACs both in how to best respond this population in their own programs, but also in their advocacy efforts on behalf of these children and their families. Evidence has shown that there are services and there is hope for children experiencing sexual behavior problems.

B4. Follow the Evidence in Sex Trafficking Cases

Julie Kenniston

Description

The content that forensic interviewers should incorporate in interviews of minors suspected as trafficking and/or internet crimes victims. The focus will be on non-caregiver cases. Commercial sexual exploitation interviews will be compared and contrasted to intra-familial cases. Strategies to obtain case specific details will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will compare and contrast commercial sexual exploitation interviews with intrafamilial sex abuse interviews.
  2. Participants will learn question strategies for gathering details about commercial sexual exploitation.
  3. Participants will apply the research of repeated interviews to commercial sexual exploitation cases.

Abstract

The purposed of this presentation is to offer forensic interviewers a sound approach for interviews of minors suspected as trafficking and/or internet crimes victims. The focus will be on non-caregiver cases. Commercial sexual exploitation interviews will be compared and contrasted to intrafamilial cases. Strategies to obtain case specific details will be discussed in the context of recruitment, seasoning and exploitation of minors by pimps.

To download workshop PDF: click here

B5. Child Sex Trafficking in Indian Country

Josefina Sabori, Moderator: Ronald Laney

Description

This session will explore the dangers faced by children in Indian Country that contribute to victimization through abductions, exploitation, and maltreatment in sex trafficking.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify victims of Child Sex Trafficking.
  2. Understand the abuse related to Child Sex Trafficking.
  3. Review Studies related to Child Sex Trafficking.

Abstract

Understand the abuse as it relates to child sex trafficking victims. Understand the technology being used to lure, abduct, and exploitation of victims into sex trafficking. Studies of victims of sex trafficking.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Tribal Youth; Attitudes and Experiences with Victimization-National Congress of American Indians, June 22, 2012 Human Trafficking, Sex Tourism and Child Exploitation on the Southern Border, Journal of Applied Research on Children –Vol 2, 3/15/2011, Technology and Infrastructure; Limitations to Public Safety Programs in Indian Country-OJJDP, November 2009.

To download workshop PDF: click here

B6. Witness Intimidation and Forfeiture by Wrongdoing

Matthew Dix

Description

Doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing, the steps needed to conduct such a hearing, and strategies when prosecuting cases where witnesses have been intimidated.

Learning Objectives

  1. Federal Rules of Forfeiture by Wrongdoing.
  2. Preparing for Forfeiture by Wrongdoing Hearings.
  3. Successfully handling difficult witnesses during trial.

Abstract

This lecture will offer strategies when working with intimidated witnesses such as children, mentally ill, gang victims, rape victims and domestic violence victims. Issues such as fear, forgetfulness, competency, and medical exceptions will be addressed. This presentation is designed for prosecutors and members of the prosecution team who must decide if the defendant's action has risen to the level of causing the absence of the victim or witness. The faculty member will discuss the holding in Davis v. Washington articulating the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing (also as codified in 804 (b)(6) FRE) as well as the subsequent further limits imposed by Giles v. California. The faculty member will walk you through the necessary steps to conducting a forfeiture by wrongdoing hearing. Time permitting, with respect to recanting or difficult witnesses in cases where the defendant's actions have not clearly risen to this serious level, use of FRE 801(d)(1), FRE 803, FRE 804, and 911 calls will be discussed. This presentation will also include practical tips the prosecutor should consider when contemplating any of the difficulties mentioned with these witnesses as well as review of what the prosecutor must do in these situations especially in light of Crawford v. Washington and its prodigy of cases (Davis and the limits announced in Giles) and any impact with Melendez-Diaz and Williams vs. Illinois) in order to maintain a proper record, including any tactical considerations.

To download workshop PDF: click here

B7. Victimization Among Special Populations of At-Risk Children and Youth (Three Research Papers)

Kimberly Mitchell, Lisa Jones, Heather Turner

Description

Victimization risks and mental health in special populations of children and youth.

  1. Peer Harassment among Youth with and without Different Types of Disabilities: Impact of Harassment Incidents Online, In-person, and in Mixed Modal Environments. —Kimberly Mitchell
  2. Victimization and Adversity among Children of Deployed Parents in a Nationally Representative US Sample. —Heather Turner
  3. Developing the Youth Bias Victimization Survey (Y-BVS): Understanding How At-Risk Youth Experience Bias and Hate Victimization. —Lisa Jones

Learning Objectives

  1. Attendees will learn how different forms of disability increase risk to peer harassment, including online peer bullying.
  2. Attendees will learn about victimization risks and outcomes associated with parental military deployment.
  3. Attendees will learn about gaps in our ability to measure bias and hate victimization of at-risk youth and the development of a new instrument, the Youth Bias Victimization Survey (Y-BVS).

Abstract

Victimization among children and adolescents continues to be a prevalent problem in the United States and elsewhere. However, some groups of youth may be particularly vulnerable to victimization from avariety of sources. This 90-minute workshop will provide participants with an understanding of victimization exposure and trauma symptoms among particular populations of at-risk youth. The topics of the workshopwill focus on several key areas of interest to practitioners via three papers, including: a) how youth with different forms of disabilities experience technology, in-person, and mixed forms of peer harassment victimization; b) victimization risk and emotional and behavioral problems among children with parental deployment histories; and c) improving measurement of bias and hate victimization experienced by at-risk youth. The workshop will discuss with attendees the implications of study findings for prevention and intervention strategies directed at these special populations of children and youth.

B8. Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Better Relationships Through Attachment-Based Play

Michelle Robison

Description

Theraplay is modeled on everyday, "good enough" parent-child interactions. Clinicians at all levels can understand the concepts and will learn techniques to help families with attachment issues.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the basic assumptions of Theraplay.
  2. Understand the Marshack Interaction Method assessment tool.
  3. Name the four dimensions of Theraplay: structure, nuture, engagement and challenge.

Abstract

In this presentation, participants will learn about the history and basic assumptions of Theraplay, as well as the rationale for using nurturing touch and interaction play to foster an intimate bond between child and caretaker.  The 4 dimensions of Theraplay and how they can be used to address the characteristic behavior problems of children with attachment problems will also be discussed.  Participants will also be able to experience some Theraplay techniques through role play.

To download workshop PDF: click here

B9. Combatting Secondary Traumatic Stress: Training Utilized by New York State Multi-Disciplinary Team Members in Child Protection

Mary Pulido

Description

Multi-Disciplinary Team members must "recharge" to handle the constant stress of child abuse, fatalities, domestic violence and critical incidents. Learn techniques to combat stress at the organizational, team and personal levels.

Learning Objectives

  1. The research that describes why Multi Disciplinary Team members are at risk for STS and case examples will be presented.
  2. Participants will complete assessment scales to learn their burnout, STS and job satisfaction levels.
  3. Participants will practice self-care exercises to use during and following work.

Abstract

This training, utilized throughout New York State in 2015 and 2016, teaches multi-disciplinary team members (MDT), clinicians and front-line child protective service workers about the symptoms and impact of secondary traumatic stress (STS). Working with clients after the violence of child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, or other critical incidents, requires tremendous intensity and can be very draining on the staff. It takes a great deal of energy to stay connected with the client and witness their pain and suffering. Front-line staff and MDT members are at risk for STS due to the nature of their work. They may experience visual images of their clients' traumatic stories intruding into their thoughts outside of work.

They may feel estranged from their families and avoid situations that remind them of their clients' traumatic experiences. Since STS can negatively affect a person's life, this training concentrates on recognizing, responding and preventing STS. It targets intervention strategies at three levels: organizational, workerteam and personal. The training includes reflective activities, self-assessment tools and interactive group exercises designed to engage the participants and create an atmosphere of support and involvement. The participants will have concrete skills to utilize immediately to prevent and manage secondary traumatic stress. They will develop a stronger capacity for self-protection and self-care.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Pulido, M.L.( 2012). The Ripple Effect: Lessons Learned About Secondary Traumatic Stress Among Clinicians Responding to the September 11th Terrorist Attacks. Clinical Social Work Journal, published online: 27 March 2012.
  • Bonach, K., & Heckert, A. (2012). Predictors of secondary traumatic stress among children's advocacy center forensic interviewers. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 21(3), 295-314.
  • Perez, L.M., Jones, J., Englert, D.R., & Sachau, D. (2010). Secondary traumatic stress and burnout among law enforcement investigators exposed to disturbing media images. J Police Crim Psych, 25, 113-124.
To download a zipped folder of workshop PDFs: click here

B12. Ethical Issues in the Delivery of Evidence-Based Practice

Moderator: Jon Conte, Lucy Berliner, Anthony Mannarino

Description

This presentation will describe ethical dilemmas that clinicians may encounter in the implementaton of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT).

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will better understand the importance of balancing fidelity and flexibility in the implementation of TF-CBT.
  2. Participants will be able to identify some of the ethical challenges associated with the implementation of TF-CBT.
  3. Participants will develop a better understanding as to when it may not be appropriate to initiate trauma treatment.

Abstract

This presentation will describe ethical dilemmas that clinicians may encounter in the implementaton of TFCBT, including when clients may not be appropriate for trauma treatment, conducting TF-CBT when there is ongoing exposure to trauma, how to determine if a clieint is ready to work on a trauma narrative, and how does the clinician know that TF-CBT is finished.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Cohen, J.A., Mannarino, A.P., & Iyengar, S. (2011). Community treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder for children exposed to intimate partner violence. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 165, 16-21.
  • Deblinger, E., Mannarino, A.P., Cohen, J.A., Runyon, M., & Steer, R. (2011). Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for children: Impact of the trauma narrative and treatment length. Depression and Anxiety, 28, 67-75.
  • Mannarino, A.P., Cohen, J.A., Deblinger, E., Runyon, M.K., & Steer, R.A. (2012). Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for children: Sustained impact of treatment 6 and 12 months later. Child Maltreatment, 17, 231-241.

B13. Building Bridges Between the Clinic and the Courtroom: A Collaboration Between the Medical and Legal Professions in the Treatment of Child Abuse

Lisa Smith, Matthew D’Emic

Description

Providers in the areas of child abuse and domestic violence require pre-employment training. This presentation provides a multidisciplinary curriculum that can be replicated for training purposes in fields of medicine, law, or social work.

Learning Objectives

  1. Showcase an innovative curriculum to teach the requisite skills for effective management of cases of child abuse for medical providers, social workers, agency employees and law enforcement.
  2. Highlight strategies to establish a collaborative approach between the different disciplines involved in the management of most cases of child abuse.
  3. Stress importance of understanding the legal system and its impact on management and early intervention in child abuse cases.

Abstract

Child abuse and domestic violence are leading public health problems with significant morbidity and mortality. Previous studies indicate that providers entering these fields often lack knowledge and confidence in addressing the cases they will inevitably be assigned. Despite training efforts, pediatricians, lawyers and social workers readily report their discomfort in identifying and reporting suspected abuse with the most self-reported contributor to this discomfort being lack of education and training around this issue.

This presentation will use an interactive format with team-based learning to showcase an innovative curriculum designed to teach the requisite skills for multidisciplinary providers to effectively manage cases of child abuse. These skills include initial interaction with the family as well as documentation of the encounter for medical providers, social workers, agency employees and law enforcement. The presentation will stress building communication between the different disciplines involved in almost every child abuse case without "pointing fingers," but rather building a relationship of trust and cooperation. This program will provide a multidisciplinary educational curriculum in child abuse that can be adapted and replicated for both education and training purposes in any one of these disciplines.
Our curriculum was designed to simulate a child abuse and domestic violence encounter in its entirety – from initial presentation to the management of this case in a courtroom environment. This simulated learning environment not only provides educators and trainees insight into possible practice applications, but may also highlight areas for further practice improvement.

This program will use a multidisciplinary approach to enhance the professional skills and knowledge of those responsible for communicating with and treating victims of family violence and child abuse.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • “I Know Something Happened!: Physician Management of Parental Disclosure of Suspected Child Sexual Abuse," MedEdPORTAL, January 2013 (with Dr. Ingrid Walker-Descartes et al.).
  • “Talk to Someone and Get Help if You are a Victim of Sexual Abuse" Expert Beacon Ingrid Walker-Descartesa, Yvette M. Sealyb, Danielle Laraquea, Mary Rojasal.
  • "Caregiver perceptions of sexual abuse and its effect on management after a disclosure," Child Abuse & Neglect, Volume 35, Issue 6, June 2011, Pages 437–447.

 

 

C1. Investigating Sexual Assaults Against People With Disabilities

Joanne Archambault, Marilyn Kaufhold

Description

Ensure that people with disabilities who are victimized have equal access to information, programs, and services—and that they are treated with fairness, compassion, and respect.

Learning Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the prevalence and impact of sexual assault committed against people with disabilities.
  2. Recognize the general framework for crafting an investigative strategy, based on key factors such as whether the victim is capable of consenting to sexual activity and whether the suspect is in a caregiver role or other position of authority.
  3. Utilize recommended best practices during the various stages of the investigation, including the initial response and preliminary investigation, the detailed follow-up interview(s) with the victim, and other steps that should be taken to identify additional evidence and witnesses.
  4. Evaluate whether a victim has the capacity to legally consent to sexual acts.  
  5. Recognize promising practices when working with sexual assault victims who have cognitive disabilities, with particular emphasis on intellectual disabilities.
  6. Recognize the fundamental implications for how the investigation and prosecution will proceed, particularly during the interview and the unique responses needed when working with people with moderate and severe disabilities. We will briefly describe the various legal tests and strategies used to answer this question.
  7. Implement initiatives to improve the community response to individuals with disabilities that can be undertaken with multidisciplinary collaboration, such as a Sexual Assault Response and Resource Team (SARRT).

Abstract

Critical Need for Training
Most training on sexual assault of people with disabilities focuses on issues such as the following:

  • Definitions of certain types of disability
  • Legal requirements such as the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • Descriptions/characteristics of various disabilities
  • Physical accessibility issues
  • Communication guidelines (e.g., language use, communication aids and services)
  • Etiquette/respect

These are critically important areas, and the primary message of such training is often to "see the person, not the disability." Police officers are taught to approach victims with disabilities and the investigation "like they would in any other case." The hope is that victims who have a disability will be treated with the same respect as other victims, and this is an important goal we all need to support.
However, when training for law enforcement focuses solely on respect, police officers are left wondering what they should actually do when they are assigned to investigate a crime against a person with a disability. How do they approach the victim, craft an investigative strategy, and gather and document the relevant evidence? How do they effectively communicate with victims, and ensure they are doing everything they can to protect victims' safety while still respecting their self-autonomy? How do they access and utilize the people, technologies, and resources that might be available to help?

Who Will Benefit
This training will provide information and guidance for first responders. However, it is intended to be equally helpful for others whose work intersects with the criminal justice system, to ensure that people with disabilities who are victimized have equal access to information, programs, and services – and that they are treated with fairness, compassion, and respect. Everyone involved in the criminal justice and community response system plays a critical role in providing that access and fair treatment.

To download a zipped folder of workshop PDFs: click here

C2. How States are Responding to Federal Calls for Psychotropic Medication Oversight Plans

Laurel Leslie, Thomas Mackie

Description

This session reviews recent federal legislation regarding psychotropic medication oversight for youth in foster care and how child welfare, Medicaid, and/or mental health leaders have responded.

Learning Objectives

  1. State initial and contemporary concerns regarding trends in safe and judicious use of psychotropic medication use among children in foster care within the United States.
  2. Know what evidence is informing state response to federal calls for oversight of psychotropic medication use among children in foster care.
  3. Understand the range of responses states are choosing to address this challenge and tradeoffs associated with varied approaches.

Abstract

In 2011, growing concerns regarding psychotropic medication use and safety among children in foster care prompted federal legislation, requiring state child welfare, Medicaid, and mental health leaders to develop oversight plans for psychotropic medication use in this vulnerable population. States varied in their readiness to implement plans and their choice of strategies.  This session reviews the research and clinical evidence that informed the passage of federal legislation and state-level psychotropic medication monitoring mechanisms implemented in response to the legislation.  The most frequently implemented strategies included collegial secondary review, prior authorization, and database reviews; states varied in their prior efforts with respect to psychotropic monitoring mechanisms, their readiness to implement or update psychotropic monitoring mechanisms, their ability to partner across child-serving agencies, and their ability to monitor outcomes.  Data from two national studies will be presented and time will be provided for discussion among participants about strengths and challenges with different approaches.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • GAO. Foster children: HHS could provide additional Guidance to states regarding psychotropic medications.  Washington, DC: US Government Accountability Office, 2014.
  • Mackie TI, Hyde J, Palinkas LA, Niemi E, Leslie LK. Fostering psychotropic medical oversight for children in foster care: A national examination of states' monitoring mechanisms.  Adm Policy Mental Health. Published online: 10 February 2016. DOI 10.1007/s10488-016-0721-x.
  • Crystal S, Mackie TI, Fenton MC, Amin S, Nees-Todd S, Olfson M, Bilder S.  Rapid growth of antipsychotic prescriptions for children who are publicly insured has ceased, but concerns remain.  Health Affairs 35 (6): 974-982. DOI 10.1377./hltaff.2016.0064
To download workshop PDF: click here

C3. News You Can Use: Hot Research in the Past Year

Lucy Berliner, Benjamin Saunders

Description

Research Studies published in the past year that has the most meaningful impact on the practices of child abuse professionals. Implications for daily practice.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the methods and findings of 12-14 of the most important research studies published in 2015.
  2. Know how to apply scientific research findings to their specific work in the child abuse field.
  3. Know the implications of the research reviewed for how they conduct their practices as child abuse professionals.

Abstract

A key element of evidence-based practiced is the use of the very best scientific research in everyday practice with typical patients and clients. A goal of evidence-based practice is for usual practice to be continually informed by reliable research findings so that patients and clients can benefit from it.

Unfortunately, front-line child abuse practitioners rarely can sift through the hundreds of research studies published each year that may be relevant to their work and determine how the results of each may or may not apply to what they do. This problem is particularly true of professionals working in the mental health or child welfare systems.

In this presentation, approximately 12–14 of the most important and critical research studies published in 2015 that are most relevant to child abuse professionals working in these systems will be reviewed. Reviews will include descriptions of the target populations and the sampling methods, measures used, design and methodology of the research, the most important findings, and study limitations. Most important, the implications of each research study for how it might influence everyday practice by mental health practitioners and child welfare professionals will be discussed.

Participants will be encouraged to comment on the research studies and to offer their thoughts and ideas about the how the research findings might influence their practice.

C4. Building on the Foundation of Multidisciplinary Team Success: Strategic Partnerships

David Betz

Description

Developing Strategic Partnerships is common core to the success of CACs. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss success, challenges, and future initiatives regarding strategic partners.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understanding how to assess strategic partnerships.
  2. What are the key elements to planning a successful strategic partnership?
  3. Understanding the FBI & NCA MOU as well as future partnership initiatives.

Abstract

Building partnerships that are aligned and balanced can be quite beneficial; but it's not always easy. Partnerships should benefit both organizations and assist in the completion of their overall mission and/or goals and should build upon both organizations foundation of success. Before entering into a strategic partnership, key elements should be well investigated and thoroughly discussed before final implementation. The partnership should increase effectiveness and relevance to reaching both organizations goals while continued communication throughout the partnership is vital to the ongoing success of the initiative.

Planning and cultivating the relationship takes time and energy; however, the right partnership can reap benefits for all involved. There are key elements that organizations should follow when developing partnerships or collaborative agreements with others. It may not land you on the moon, or an unlimited funding stream, but preparation and understanding these elements when developing strategic partnerships is a must.

On behalf of its accredited members, The National Children's Alliance developed a memorandum of understanding with the FBI to ensure that all children who need access to the services of a Children's Advocacy Center have an evidence-based intervention that helps them heal. At the same time while ensuring that our law enforcement partners have the resources they need to investigate and prosecute these cases. This MOU has been highly successful and is building a firm foundation for future partnerships.

To download workshop PDF: click here

C5. Case Study—Thinking Outside the Box: Solving Child Abuse Investigations with the Help of Technology, Part 1

Jeffrey Rich

Description

This case study will review a child exploitation case from start to finish and will discuss thinking outside the normal avenues to solve the investigation through the use of technology.

Learning Objectives

  1. Students will understand the use of metadata and how to obtain it.
  2. Students will understand the concepts of data forensics.
  3. Students will understand methods in which children are exploited through technology.

Abstract

Solving complex child abuse cases is difficult even on good days, but as technology has advanced, our
cases have become more complex and require more skills and knowledge that ever before. This session will provide an overview of some of the skills needed to successfully investigate cases where technology can be used to aid in the solution.

C6. 3 Steps to Improve the Legal Lives of LGBTQ Youth

Gary Bevel, Esq.

Description

Legal victories for LGBT equity are incomplete without inclusion of youth, a focus on their legal needs, and commitment to the elimination of bias at the personal, organizational and system level.

Learning Objectives

  1. Effective, impartial legal advocacy must start with exposure of implicit bias and self-examination of cultural competency.
  2. Include motivtional counseling of LGBT youth client with an understanding of their unique, overlapping needs and experiences.
  3. A commitment to building coalition to expose the individual biases and practices that maintain prejudiced systems.

Abstract

This workshop will highlight why advanced LGBTQ cultural competency is required to effectively advocate for LGBTQ youth; how to equitably apply existing policy and law to the unique needs of LGBTQ youth; why building coalition and a culture of diplomatic disruption is critical to practical and sustainable change and implementation of inclusive policy and law.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

To download workshop PDF: click here

C7-a. Evidnece-Based Treatment and Youth Diversity: What We Know and Why It Matters

Stanley Huey

Description

An overview of the research on EBTs for diverse youth and the role of "cultural responsiveness." Guidelines for providing treatments to diverse populations will be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn what approaches work for engaging and treating diverse children and adolescents with mental health problems.
  2. Learn how EBT research applies to diverse children and families.
  3. Learn about the role of cultural responsiveness and cultural tailoring when working with diverse children and families.

Abstract

This talk will provide an overview of the research on evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for children and adolescents, with a particular focus on therapies for diverse populations and the role of "cultural responsiveness." Misconceptions about the utility of EBTs with "real-world" youth will be addressed, but challenges to transporting EBTs to community clinics will also be discussed. Broad guidelines for providing efficacious treatments to diverse populations will be presented.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Huey, S. J., Jr., & Polo, A. J. (2008). Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for ethnic minority youth. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37, 262-301.
  • Huey, S. J., Jr., Tilley, J. L., Jones, E. O., & Smith, C. (2014). The contribution of cultural competence to evidence-based care for ethnically diverse populations. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 10, 305-33.

To download workshop PDF: click here


C7-b. A Randomized Implementation Study of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adjudicated Youth in Residential Treatment Facilities

Judith Cohen, Anthony Mannarino

Description

This presentation describes a randomized study evaluating two alternative strategies for implementing Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for teens who were adjudicated to residential treatment facilities across New England.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe one benefit of each implementation strategy used in the study (Web versus Web+ Live).           
  2. Describe three significant differences between the Web versus Web+ Live strategies.   
  3. Describe TF-CBT outcomes for adjudicated youth regarding PTSD and depression.

Abstract

Background: Adjudicated youth in residential treatment facilities (RTF) have high rates of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study evaluated strategies for implementing Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) in RTF. Methods: Therapists (N=129) treating adjudicated youth were randomized by RTF program (N=18) to receive one of two TF-CBT implementation strategies: 1) web-based TF-CBT training + consultation ("W"); or 2) W+ 2 day live TF-CBT workshop + twice monthly phone consultation ("W+L"). Youth trauma screening and PTSD symptoms were assessed via online dashboard data entry using the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index.  Youth depressive symptoms were assessed with the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire-Short Version. Outcomes were therapist screening; TF-CBT engagement, completion and fidelity; and youth improvement in PTSD and depressive symptoms.

Results: The W+L condition resulted in significantly more therapists conducting trauma screening (p=.0005), completing treatment (p=.03) and completing TF-CBT with fidelity (p=.001) than the W condition. Therapist licensure significantly impacted several outcomes. Adjudicated RTF youth receiving TF-CBT across conditions experienced statistically and clinically significant improvement in PTSD (p=0.001) and depressive (p=.018) symptoms.

Conclusions: W+L is generally superior to W for implementing TF-CBT in RTF. TF-CBT is effective for improving trauma-related symptoms in adjudicated RTF youth. Implementation barriers are discussed.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Cohen, JA, Mannarino, AP, Kleithermes, M & Murray, LA (2012). Trauma-focused CBT for youth with complex trauma. Child Abuse & Neglect, 36, 528-541.
  • Cohen, JA, Mannarino, AP, Jankowski, MK, Rosenberg, S, Kodya, S & Wolford, G (in press). A randomized implemenation study of trauma-focused CBT for adjudicated teens in residential treatment facilities. Child Maltreatment.

C8. From Mild to Complex: A Community Approach to Supprt Young Children with Developmental and Behavioral Challenges

Pradeep Gidwani, Jennifer Wheeler

Description

What works: Lessons learned from creating a developmental/behavioral system of care based on community need.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify elements of a comprehensive system of care.
  2. Identify what works to help children and their families.
  3. Translate lessons learned to one's own community.

Abstract

Since 2000 when From Neurons to Neighborhoods was published, attention to the developmental and behavioral needs of young children and their families has grown. Even in light of the increased understanding of early brain development and the importance of relationships in early child development, an increasing number of young children arrive at kindergarten unprepared to learn. Although most children develop along a normal trajectory, more than a quarter of children in the U.S. need support and treatment to stay on track for healthy development and kindergarten readiness. Currently, limited services are available for a small percentage of children who face severe developmental or behavioral problems.

Since 2006, San Diego County has built a comprehensive behavioral and developmental system of care for children ages 0-5 and their families. Our system addresses needs from mild to complex. Our system was built with ongoing community input and dedicated Countywide Coordination and Support. Our session will focus on what works to change the trajectories for young children and their families.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development.
  • Jack P. Shonkoff and Deborah A. Phillips, (Eds.), Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  • Halfon, N., Russ, S., & Regalado, M. (2004). Building a model system of developmental services in Orange County. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families, and Communities, UCLA School of Public Health. American Academy of Pediatrics. (2006).
  • Identifying infants and young children with developmental disorders in the medical home: An algorithm for developmental surveillance and screening. Pediatrics, 118, 405–420.

To download workshop PDF: click here

C9. Integrated Family Services: A Model for Building Protective Factors

Malcolm Gaines

Description

Describes an outcome-focused, data-informed, strength-based model for promoting protective factors in individual high-risk families.

Learning Objectives

  1. Attendees will understand the proposed relationship between risk factors and protective factors in the model presented.
  2. Attendees will understand how the Five Protective Factors can be operationalized in an outcome-focused service delivery model.
  3. Attendees will gain knowledge of how effective care coordination can support atrisk families.

Abstract

The presentation describes an outcome-focused, data-informed, strength-based model for delivering and managing services that promote protective factors in individual high-risk families. This innovative model was developed at the San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center. It uses the Five Protective Factors (as researched by the Center for the Study of Social Policy) as outcomes within a wraparound-style service delivery system, to support strengths in high-risk families and prevent child abuse. The model was developed in response to the need in the child abuse prevention field to integrate risk assessment with a focus on protective factors that mitigate risk. It is outlined in "The Case for Prevention: A Two-Generation Approach to Ending Child Abuse," in Two Generations. One Future: An Anthology from the Ascend Fellowship.
Integrated Family Services is in its third year of development, and to date, 83% of participating families improve their protective factors within six months. Current data and a case example are presented to explain and support the model.

To download workshop PDF: click here

C12. Ethical Issues in Child Welfare and Child Mental Health

Jon Conte, Barbara Stone

Description

Ethical and practice issues in child welfare and in the interface of child welfare and mental health practice will be discussed. At times distinguishing between what is ethical vs. a practice problem is difficult. This workshop will review common ethical and practice issues in child welfare and mental health practice, provide a framework for analyzing complex issues, and apply same to complex cases. The case will provide an opportunity to distinguish between ethical and practice issues. Participants are encouraged to bring their own case issues to the workshop.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about the ethical issues in the field of child welfare and the mental health practice.
  2. Distinguishing between what is ethical vs. a practice problem.

To download workshop PDF: click here

C13. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Assessing Children's Advocacy center Partnerships

Debra Anderson, Gene Klein

Description

Child abuse and neglect are community problems, requiring a response from law enforcement, child protective services, medical professionals, and others. Given that collaboration is central to the CAC movement, how do leaders develop, assess, and monitor partnerships with multiple disciplines-particularly when some of those relationships may be "have-to" rather than "want-to?"

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize the differences between mandated, essential, and voluntary partnerships.
  2. Learn how to utilize a partnership analysis tool in your CAC.
  3. Consider the impact of conflict on relationships between partners.

Abstract

Central to the child advocacy movement is the belief that coordination among the various professions involved would improve the experience of children and enhance the effectiveness of case outcomes (Cross et al., 2008).

While studies have evaluated the CAC model of collaboration in terms of child outcomes (Walsh et al., 2003; OJJDP, 2007; Lippert et al., 2007), little has been done to examine how a CAC should select, monitor, and assess partnerships with law enforcement, prosecution, medical providers, child welfare and other service agencies. Anecdotally, CAC employees may talk about partnerships that are working well and those that are more challenging. However, given the model's focus on multi-disciplinary collaboration, it is time for CACs to consider a more formal and structured process for analyzing potential and existing partnerships.

The presenters, first, recognize the differences between mandated, essential, and voluntary partnerships and how knowing the type clarifies partnership adaptations. Second, we present a partnership analysis tool adapted from health care networks that evaluates prospective and existing partnerships based on five critical factors: Leadership, decision-making, efficiency, administration, and resources (financial/non-financial). Finally, to underscore the dynamic nature of CAC partnerships, we draw on Himmelman's Collaboration Process (2002) and Moore's conflict strategies (2014) to consider the interrelatedness of developmental stage and tolerance of risk when assessing potential or existing partners.

To download workshop handout: click here

To download workshop PDF: click here

 

 

D1. Medical Neglect in Childhood

Barbara Knox, Debra Esernio-Jenssen

Description

Medical neglect in childhood requires unique expertise by healthcare providers for appropriate recognition and response. This presentation will address the specific components required by the medical community to accurately identify/diagnose and document this form of neglect. Additionally, appropriate medical and social interventions as well as religion-motivated medical neglect will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review the diagnostic criteria for medical neglect in childhood.
  2. Learn appropriate medical documentation for cases of medical neglect.
  3. Address appropriate medical and social responses for medical neglect intervention.

Abstract

Medical neglect in childhood requires unique expertise by healthcare providers for appropriate recognition and response. This presentation will address the specific components required by the medical community to accurately identify/diagnose and document this form of neglect. Additionally, appropriate medical and social interventions as well as religion-motivated medical neglect will be reviewed.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Varness, T, et al. Childhood obesity and medical neglect. Pediatrics. 2009 January; 123(1) 399-406.
  • Harper, NS. Neglect: failure to thrive and obesity. Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2014 (61); 937-57.
  • Jenny, C. Recognizing and Responding to Medical Neglect. Pediatrics 2007;120;1385.
  • Asser, SM and Swan, R. Child Fatalities from Religion-motivated Medical Neglect. Pediatrics 1998;101;625.
  • Dubowitz, Howard. Neglect of Children's Health Care. The APSAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment Third Edition. Myers, J. Ed. Sage Publications.

D2. Assessing the Risk for Suicide and Self-Harm in Youth: What You Should Know—Part 2

Jeffrey Rowe

Description

This presentation will discuss and then demonstrate tools, techniques, and methods used to clinically identify and rate the immediate risk of a youth. A simulation interview will demonstrate these techniques.

Learning Objectives

  1. Be able to identify which screening tools identify high risk populations.
  2. Be able to identify which factors should be used to clarify the imminent risk of a person who presents with suicidal ideation.
  3. Be able to discuss elements of the clinical interview that facilitate arriving at a useful suicide risk assessment for youth.

D3. "No Justice, No Peace:" Supporting African American Communities to Become Sustainably Trauma-Informed and Resilient

Elizabeth Thompson

Description

This workshop will provide the opportunity to hear about trauma informed responses to racially charged events that stemmed from the deaths of unarmed African American men at the hands of police.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore leveraging of NCTSN resources to respond to racially charged crises.
  2. Discuss strategies to effectively partner with African American communities impacted by systematic stress.
  3. Experience Resiliency and Coping Intervention group to process thoughts and feelings related to racial tension.

Abstract

Around since the 1970's, the slogan "No Justice No Peace" has been used recently to voice the struggles of African American citizens facing the impact of racism and racial injustices that perpetuate disparities.

This workshop will discuss the mental health impact of racism and racialized community trauma; the existing and ongoing needs of children, families, providers and communities; services delivered; and the adaptation and resilience of communities.

Responses to Freddie Gray's death in Baltimore and Michael Brown's death in Ferguson will be discussed. Metric data from the racial justice initiative of a recently convened Breakthrough Series Collaborative in Baltimore as well as resident survey data from the St. Louis metropolitan area will be presented.

Discussion will include identifying strategies/resources that might be relevant and applicable in attendees own communities. This workshop will set the stage for a follow-up 60 minute experiential activity designed for participants to explore their thoughts and feelings around some of the issues raised.

D4. Behind the Scenes: Improving the Children's Advocacy Center Forensic Interview

Holly Chandler

Description

The focus of this presentation will be on the significant role the CAC plays before the forensic interview even begins.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participant will be able to explain how to avoid miscommunication when coordinating an interview.
  2. Participant will be able to explain what to expect in the pre-staffing process before the forensic interview begins.
  3. Participant will be able to recognize distractions in the CAC that can make the forensic interview unsuccessful.

Abstract

The focus of this presentation will be on the significant role the CAC plays before the forensic interview even begins. This presentation will highlight how the CAC can prepare to avoid common errors that may negatively affect the forensic interview while improving interdisciplinary collaboration and case outcomes.

Attendees will learn how to avoid miscommunication when coordinating interviews and how to recognize distractions in the CAC that can make the forensic interview unsuccessful.

To download workshop PDF: click here

D5. Case Study—Thinking Outside the Box: Solving Child Abuse Investigations with the Help of Technology, Part 2

Jeffrey Rich

Description

This case study will review a child exploitation case from start to finish and will discuss thinking outside the normal avenues to solve the investigation through the use of technology.

Learning Objectives

  1. Students will understand the use of metadata and how to obtain it.
  2. Students will understand the concepts of data forensics.
  3. Students will understand methods in which children are exploited through technology.

Abstract

Solving complex child abuse cases is difficult even on good days, but as technology has advanced, our
cases have become more complex and require more skills and knowledge that ever before. This session will provide an overview of some of the skills needed to successfully investigate cases where technology can be used to aid in the solution.

D6. Forensic Interview Techniques for Prosecutors

Tom Fallon, Julie Kenniston

Description

Preparing children for court is a skill that can be enhanced by incorporating research-based techniques being used in forensic interviews.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will generate developmentally and linguistically sensitive questions for child.
  2. Participants will discuss the possibilities of using narrative event practice techniques in direct examination.
  3. Learn to avoid the pitfalls associated with complex and compound questions that are beyond the developmental capacity of children.

Abstract

Prosecutors could benefit greatly by using the skills and techniques of Forensic Interviewers when preparing for and conducting direct examinations of child victims. This presentation will assist prosecutors in generating developmentally and linguistically sensitive questions for children that enhance their presentation in court.

To download workshop PDF: click here

D7. Session info to come.

D8. The Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention: Early Intervention for At-Risk Children

Carrie Epstein, Steven Marans, Hilary Hahn

Description

The Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI): a brief, evidence-based trauma-focused model developed to be implemented soon after a potentially traumatic event or formal disclosure of physical or sexual abuse.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will gain a general understanding of the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), an evidence-based, early trauma-focused treatment.
  2. Participants will learn about the clinical goals of an early, trauma-focused mental health treatment that can be implemented in a variety of settings.
  3. Participants will understand the positive impact that CFTSI has had on service delivery in CACs and other settings in helping traumatized children and families rebuild their lives as part of a practice-based, research-informed approach.

Abstract

This workshop will describe the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), a brief, evidence-based trauma-focused mental health treatment for children and adolescents. CFTSI was developed specifically for implementation in the peritraumatic period, which covers the initial days and weeks following a traumatic event, or following recent formal disclosure of physical or sexual abuse (such as in a forensic interview).

CFTSI aims to improve screening and initial assessment of children impacted by traumatic stress; reduce post-traumatic stress symptoms; and reduce or interrupt PTSD and related disorders. CFTSI focuses on: increasing family support for a child exposed to potentially traumatic events, enhancing communication between the child and the caregiver about the child’s symptoms, and providing skills to help children and families cope with and master trauma reactions. Implemented soon after a potentially traumatic event or formal disclosure of physical or sexual abuse (such as in a forensic interview), CFTSI offers the opportunity for early symptom reduction and provides a seamless introduction to longer-term treatment and other mental health interventions when needed.

In addition to describing the CFTSI model and the results of a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial, the workshop will describe the process of implementing this model within the CAC setting and its positive impact on CAC service delivery in helping victims of crime rebuild their lives as part of a victim-centered, practice-based, research-informed approach.

Published Articles on Evidence-based Topics

  • Hahn H, Oransky M, Epstein C, Smith Stover C, Marans S (2015) Findings of an early intervention to address children’s traumatic stress implemented in the child advocacy center setting following sexual abuse. J Child Adolesc Trauma 1–12. doi: 10.1007/s40653-015-0059-7.
  • Landholt, M, Cloitre, M (eds) Evidence-Based Treatments for Trauma Related Disorders in Children and Adolescents. In The Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company (in press).
  • Marans S (2013) Phenomena of childhood trauma and expanding approaches to early intervention. Int J Appl Psychoanal Stud 10(3):247–266. doi: 10.1002/aps.1369.
  • Oransky M, Hahn H, Stover CS (2013) Caregiver and youth agreement regarding youths’ trauma histories: implications for youths’ functioning after exposure to trauma. J Youth Adolesc 42(10):1528–1542. doi: 10.1007/s10964-013-9947-z.
  • Trickey D, Siddaway AP, Meiser-Stedman R, Serpell L, Field AP (2012) A meta-analysis of risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents. Clin Psychol Rev 32(2):122–138. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2011.12.001.

D9. Family Finding and Engagement Project: Results from a One Year Program Evaluation

Vincent Madera, Liat Shklarski

Description

A workshop on the Family Finding Engagement Intervention; helping youth who are in foster care, or at risk of being placed in foster care, to reconnect with their families, expand their social-support network, and their lifelong connections.

Learning Objectives

  1. Audience will learn about the stages of the intervention.
  2. Audience will learn about the evidence collected and analyzed about the intervention.
  3. Audience will be actively practicing a part of the intervention in small groups.

Abstract

The presentation is based on results from a one-year evaluation program testing the effectiveness of the Family Finding Engagement Intervention. This intervention is targeted at helping youth who are in care, or at risk of being placed in care, to reconnect with their families, expand their social-support network, and their lifelong connections. The presentation will cover the key practical elements in the intervention and the analysis of their success in engaging families and creating connections. It will conclude with a short handson workshop on utilizing specific techniques that has been proven to be successful in the intervention evaluation.

Audience will gain knowledge about the Family Finding and Engagement Intervention to a degree that will allow them to utilize the intervention in their agencies.

D12. Protecting Clients in Forensic and Mental Health Practice in the Modern Age

Jon Conte, David Corwin, Nicole Kluemper

Description

This workshop provides a rare opportunity to hear how a professional worked to maintain the rights of a forensic evaluation subject who gave permission for the publication of a case report “to help others” and her experience after the violation of many of these same rights. The workshop will include a brief overview of human subjects’ protection interests, case report publication, and the efforts to assure the subject’s rights. Participants are encouraged to share their experiences and perspectives.

Learning Objectives

  1. Overview of human subjects' protection.
  2. How to advance knowledge by sharing important individual observations while protecting the rights of clients/subjects.

Abstract

In the real world where knowledge has direct and often powerful impact on the lives of those whose life is touched by abuse there is a balance between protecting the rights of clients/subjects and knowledge development. Over decades principles have developed to protect human subjects and the rights of individuals based on time honored values such as privacy and confidentiality.

This workshop provides a rare opportunity to hear how a professional worked to maintain the rights of a forensic evaluation subject who gave permission for the publication of a case report “to help others” and her experience after the violation of many of these same rights. The workshop will include a brief overview of human subjects protection interests in single subject investigation and case report publication, the efforts the professional who authored the case report took to assure the subject’s rights, and to support the subject after the violation along with the adult subject’s natural history of the violation of those rights over the following 20 years.

Participants are encouraged to share their experiences and perspectives. It is hoped that participants will have a renewed commitment to the development of knowledge through the analysis of their own cases and of efforts to advance knowledge by sharing important individual observations while protecting the rights of clients/subjects.

D13. Using Lessons Learned About Prevention and Trauma to Prevent Ideologically Inspired Violence

Agatha Glowacki, Terry Carrilio, Erin Wilson

Description

Since 9/11 we have seen a proliferation of ideologically based violent incidents and mass killings, which upon analysis, are driven by complex personal, social, and political factors. Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) is a multifaceted approach to vulnerable individuals and communities. Originally driven by security and public safety concerns, partnering with mental health, public health, and social service providers has been a critical gap in CVE efforts thus far. This workshop will present an overview of CVE efforts and begin an important dialogue about how to introduce what we know from research in child welfare, trauma, and violence prevention into effective, evidence based programs to reduce ideologically based violence.

Learning Objectives

  1. Present the child welfare, health, mental health, and human services community with an understanding of the process of radicalization and mobilization to violent action to better educate them about how their work and lessons learned can help in preventing violent extremism.
  2. Provide the human services community with an understanding of potential roles they can play in preventing violent extremism and violence prevention among at-risk, youth, and refugee populations.
  3. Begin a dialogue that highlights key areas of research on trauma, culture, resilience, and brain development for researchers to further explore that could deepen our the current understanding of violence extremism and its prevention.

Abstract

Successfully preventing violent extremism must begin in the building of peaceful and inclusive societies composed of healthy and resilient individuals. Law enforcement has been the primary lead on efforts to address violent extremism to date in the U.S., but new initiatives have recognized the importance of leveraging and partnering with mental health, child welfare, public health, and social service providers.

Research in child welfare, violence prevention, and trauma offers important insights and practical understanding about programs that address complex, multi-faceted individual, family, and community vulnerabilities. Practitioners and researchers from these sectors are best placed to address certain underlying factors and drivers of violent extremism as well as identify intervention strategies that enhance resilience by building protective factors. Lessons learned in prevention and early intervention can be invaluable to developing non-criminal prevention and intervention initiatives for individuals attracted to violent extremism. Partnerships with professionals and researchers in community based prevention and intervention efforts is essential if CVE programs are to be effective.

This workshop will provide a conceptual overview of the path to violent extremism and the various factors involved, with a particular focus on drivers related to mental health, trauma, and personal vulnerabilities. An overview of the 2011 U.S. National Strategy for Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism will follow, highlighting the key areas and roles for public health, child welfare, mental health, and social service health providers to plug into. An analysis of current gaps will be shared, based on the 2015 START report Lessons Learned from Mental Health and Education: Identifying Best Practices for Addressing Violent Extremism. Examples of how mental and social health services have been included in CVE efforts internationally will be included.

Lastly, the workshop will conclude by highlighting key research gaps in the study of violent extremism that could be filled by researchers.